Monthly Archives: May 2010

Facial Hair Friday: Handlebar mustaches are not authorized

In the U.S. Army of 2010, the regulations state that mustaches are limited to men, and the length and shape of the mustache itself is severely limited: “Mustaches are permitted; if worn, males will keep mustaches neatly trimmed, tapered, and … Continue reading

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160,000 pages to go

Whenever a member of the Supreme Court announces retirement, and another citizen is nominated to replace one of the most important seats in government, the National Archives gets busy. The nomination of Elena Kagan is no exception. The Clinton Presidential … Continue reading

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Private Babe Ruth

Today’s post comes from National Archives Office of Strategy and Communications staff writer Rob Crotty. George Herman “Babe” Ruth was no exception to the military draft that took place during World War I, but as fate would have it, the … Continue reading

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Elena Kagan owes Belva Lockwood

If Kagan’s nomination is accepted, she will be the fourth woman to serve as a Supreme Court Justice. Her nomination was made possible by the trail blazed—with tremendous determination—by Lockwood. Lockwood was the daughter of farmers, a widowed mother, and … Continue reading

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Facial Hair Friday

The Civil War was a fine time for facial hair (and I would assume now is still a fine time for the facial hair of historic reenactors). On Fridays, we’ll be posting images of the finest, most dapper facial hair … Continue reading

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Forever in blue jeans…and in court

On May 20, 1873, Jacob W. Davis received patent #139,121 for an “improvement in fastening pocket openings.” Davis’s improvement consisted of “the employment of a metal rivet or eyelet at each edge of the pocket opening to prevent the ripping … Continue reading

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Connected, hundreds of years apart

Petroglyphs, Napoleon, tobacco pigtails, the EPA. What do these have to do with each other? On May 14, 1804, the Lewis and Clark expedition set out from St. Louis, Missouri, to explore the Northwest from the Mississippi River to the … Continue reading

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Expo 2010, meet Expo 74

The World Expo 2010 in Shanghai, China, opened this month and expects to attract 70 million visitors. If you are not going to China, you can still visit the World Expos of the past, here in the National Archives. Since … Continue reading

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Forty years ago: An investigation into Kent State

Today’s post comes from National Archives Office of Strategy and Communications staff writer Rob Crotty. Forty years ago this week, four people were killed at Kent State University, fueling protests in an already divided nation.  This map was used by … Continue reading

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Mutiny on the high seas

Today’s post comes from National Archives Office of Strategy and Communications staff writer Rob Crotty. In the history of the United States Navy, no formal mutiny on the high seas has ever occurred, though one was narrowly averted on the … Continue reading

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