Striking Gold in the Records

People often refer to the National Archives as a “treasure trove” of history. Usually they’re referring to the wealth of knowledge documented in our billions of pieces of paper. But occasionally you come across something that would not be out of place in a real treasure chest. At the end of the 19th century, thousands … Continue reading Striking Gold in the Records

Disability History from the Presidential Libraries

Today's blog post is written by Susan K. Donius and Sierra Gregg. Susan K. Donius is the Director of the Office of Presidential Libraries at the National Archives and Records Administration. Sierra Gregg is a summer intern at the National Archives and a senior at Truman State University in Missouri, where she is studying Computer … Continue reading Disability History from the Presidential Libraries

A letter to the President—in Braille

This week marks the 22nd anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act. The National Archives holds many records that relate to American citizens with disabilities. From personal letters to historic legislation, these records from the Presidential Libraries provide insight into disability history. For the opening of the Public Vaults exhibition at the National Archives Building … Continue reading A letter to the President—in Braille

In their own words: Adams, Franklin, and Vergennes (part IIc)

In the last post, we brought the Adams-Vergennes story up to their abrupt break in late July 1780. Adams departed for the Netherlands, where he hoped to raise additional funds for the United States war effort and make the United States less dependent on France. Meanwhile, Vergennes appealed to Franklin and through Franklin to Congress, … Continue reading In their own words: Adams, Franklin, and Vergennes (part IIc)

Working in the National Archives: Caves

Today’s guest post is by Dana Roark, archives technician at the Lee’s Summit Federal Records Center. One of the most vivid memories I have of my first day at Lee's Summit, a National Archives facility, was the drive in to my new workplace. As I rounded the corner of the driveway, I came face-to-face with the yawning black mouth … Continue reading Working in the National Archives: Caves

Plucked from our records: Pasquale Taraffo and the Harp Guitar

 Today's post comes from Nikita Buley, an intern in the National Archives Office of Strategy and Communications. “Attachments,” the current exhibit at the National Archives in Washington, DC, tells the stories of some of the millions of people who have entered and left the United States. One visitor, Pasquale Taraffo, came to the United States … Continue reading Plucked from our records: Pasquale Taraffo and the Harp Guitar

In their own words: Franklin, Adams, and Vergennes (part IIb)

John Adams arrived in Paris arrived to find Benjamin Franklin being showered with attention (Ben Franklin at the Court of Versailles, ARC 518217) This is part of a series, written by Jim Zeender, devoted to letters written by the Founding Fathers in their own words and often in their own hand. Jim is a senior … Continue reading In their own words: Franklin, Adams, and Vergennes (part IIb)

In their own words: Thomas Jefferson and the Storming of the Bastille

This post is part of a series, written by Jim Zeender, devoted to letters written by the Founding Fathers in their own words and often in their own hand. Jim is a senior registrar in Exhibits. On July 14, 1789, the U.S. Ambassador to France, Thomas Jefferson, was a witness to the events of  a … Continue reading In their own words: Thomas Jefferson and the Storming of the Bastille

Thursday Photo Caption Contest: July 12

It's been hot here in Washington, DC. So hot that a plane got stuck in "soft spot" in the asphalt of the runway at Reagan National Airport just across the river in Alexandria, Virginia. So hot that our brains melted and we could not choose a winner from last week's caption contest. So we turned … Continue reading Thursday Photo Caption Contest: July 12

Take me out to the ballgame (and then to court)

Today's post is written by Kimberlee Ried, public programs specialist at the National Archives in Kansas City. "Take me out to the ball game, take me out with the crowd . . ."  These words, written by Jack Norworth and Albert Von Tilzer in 1908, are still heard every night at  baseball parks across America, … Continue reading Take me out to the ballgame (and then to court)