What’s Your Story, Mabel Deutrich?

Today's post for Women's History Month—in the voice of former National Archives employee Mabel Deutrich—comes from Alan Walker, archivist at the National Archives at College Park. I went to the La Crosse State Teachers College in Wisconsin. It's now the University of Wisconsin—La Crosse. I came to the Archives in 1950, after having worked with … Continue reading What’s Your Story, Mabel Deutrich?

Ida Wilson Lewis, lighthouse keeper and fearless Federal worker

Today's post comes from Ashley Mattingly, who is an archivist at the National Archives at St. Louis, where she manages the collection of archival civilian personnel records. The most well-known lighthouse keeper in the world was an American woman who was a Federal civil servant. Ida Wilson Lewis, lighthouse keeper of Rhode Island, saved somewhere … Continue reading Ida Wilson Lewis, lighthouse keeper and fearless Federal worker

Your Good Friend, Victoria R

Citizen Archivists! You can transcribe this document as part of our #SunshineWeek Transcription Challenge! The black-bordered letter sent to President Martin Van Buren relayed the official news that the king of the United Kingdom, His Majesty William IV, had died on June 20, 1837. The new monarch was the late king’s niece, 18-year-old Victoria. Writing … Continue reading Your Good Friend, Victoria R

Sara Dunlap Jackson: Archivist Extraordinaire

In honor of Women's History Month, I want to celebrate one of our most cherished former employees—Sara Dunlap Jackson. After I was appointed Historian last year, numerous local historians approached me to say that I just had to research Sara Dunlap Jackson because she was so important to the history of the agency. Sara Dunlap … Continue reading Sara Dunlap Jackson: Archivist Extraordinaire

Margaret M.H. Finch, War Records Keeper

Today's post for Women's History Month comes from Jessie Kratz, Historian of the National Archives. I was intrigued when Alan Walker discovered those wonderful ID cards of former Archives employees in Record Group 64. I noticed many were women, which makes sense given the time period, and thought it would be nice to highlight a … Continue reading Margaret M.H. Finch, War Records Keeper

On Exhibit: Americans with Disabilities Act

Today's post comes from Alex Nieuwsma, an intern in the National Archives History Office in Washington, DC.  The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, signed by President George H.W. Bush on July 26, 1990, forbids employers from discriminating against mentally or physically disabled employees. It also instituted accessibility requirements for buildings and public transportation, such as … Continue reading On Exhibit: Americans with Disabilities Act

Inventing in Congress: Patent Law since 1790

Today’s post comes from Samantha Payne, intern in the Center for Legislative Archives in Washington, DC.  In August 1791, two men received identical patents from the Federal Government. John Fitch and James Rumsey claimed to have invented the same technology: a steamboat. After a two-year battle for exclusive rights to their discovery, with Fitch calling Rumsey … Continue reading Inventing in Congress: Patent Law since 1790

On Exhibit: Report concerning the death of Abraham Lincoln

Today's post comes from Zach Kopin, an intern in the National Archives History Office in Washington, DC. On March 4, 1865, President Abraham Lincoln delivered his second inaugural address at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC. Dr. Charles A. Leale, a doctor and army surgeon in town from New York, listened with rapt attention to … Continue reading On Exhibit: Report concerning the death of Abraham Lincoln

Congress Counts: History of the U.S. Census

Today’s post comes from Samantha Payne, intern in the Center for Legislative Archives in Washington, DC.  The Constitution requires that Congress conduct a census every 10 years to determine the representation of each state in the  House of Representatives. When the authors of the Constitution allocated seats in the House for the First Congress, they had no … Continue reading Congress Counts: History of the U.S. Census