Jeannette Rankin: The woman who voted to give women the right to vote

Today’s post comes from Christine Blackerby, an archives specialist with the Center for Legislative Archives at the National Archives in Washington, DC. 2017 marks the centennial of the swearing-in of the first woman to become a member of the U.S. Congress, Jeannette Rankin (R-Montana). A pacifist and suffragist, Rankin was elected to Congress four years … Continue reading Jeannette Rankin: The woman who voted to give women the right to vote

Special Exhibit: Alexander Hamilton’s Report on Manufactures

As the first Secretary of Treasury, Alexander Hamilton had a vision for the economic foundation of the country. Its three major components were the federal assumption of state debts, the creation of a Bank of the United States, and support for the nation’s emerging industries. His first and second reports to Congress dealt with the … Continue reading Special Exhibit: Alexander Hamilton’s Report on Manufactures

“Let the Word Go Forth:” A President’s First Inaugural Address

Today’s post comes from Tom Putnam, Acting Director of the Office of Presidential Libraries. The inauguration of a new President offers the nation an opportunity to witness not only the peaceful transfer of power but also the transformation of a person we've known for over a year as a candidate, and for two months as … Continue reading “Let the Word Go Forth:” A President’s First Inaugural Address

A precedent-breaking inauguration

On January 20, 1941, President Franklin D. Roosevelt made history by being the first President to be inaugurated for a third term. The previous year, Roosevelt had been elected President for the third time, and the inauguration marked the start of his third term in office. No other President in American history had been elected … Continue reading A precedent-breaking inauguration

On Exhibit: George Washington’s First Inaugural Address and Bible

In honor of the upcoming Presidential inauguration, Washington's first inaugural address and the Bible that he used to swear his oath of office are on display. The Bible was loaned for the occasion by St. John’s Lodge No. 1, Ancient York Masons, which still owns the Bible today. Since the country’s first inauguration of George Washington … Continue reading On Exhibit: George Washington’s First Inaugural Address and Bible

Carl Laemmle: Founder of Universal Studios and Humanitarian

Today’s post comes from Jim Zeender, Senior Registrar in the National Archives Exhibits Office. One of the founders of today’s Universal Studios, Carl Laemmle, was born to Jewish parents in Lupenheim, near Stuttgart, Germany, on January 17, 1867. Young Carl immigrated to Chicago in 1884 and became a naturalized citizen five years later. His Declaration … Continue reading Carl Laemmle: Founder of Universal Studios and Humanitarian