On Exhibit: The “Yeti Memo”

Today’s post comes from Sanjana Barr from the National Archives History Office. In 1959, the U.S. State Department received a curious memo from the new U.S. Embassy in Nepal concerning the regulations for Yeti hunting. The Himalayan Yeti, a mythological creature often compared to Bigfoot, achieved international infamy in the 1950s. Western climbers ascending Mount … Continue reading On Exhibit: The “Yeti Memo”

Origins of National Hispanic Heritage Month

It’s National Hispanic Heritage Month! Visit our web page for resources on related records and how we are commemorating the month. Today's post comes from Kate Mollan, an archivist in the Center for Legislative Archives at the National Archives in Washington, DC.  It is in the tradition of our country to recognize, cherish and conserve the many … Continue reading Origins of National Hispanic Heritage Month

Constitution Day through the years

September 17 is designated as Constitution Day and Citizenship Day to commemorate the signing of the U.S. Constitution in Philadelphia on September 17, 1787! Today’s post comes from Rebecca Watford from the National Archives History Office. As the keeper of the U.S. Constitution, the National Archives has a long tradition of celebrating Constitution Day.   … Continue reading Constitution Day through the years

Hispanic and Latino Organization (HALO) at the National Archives

It’s National Hispanic Heritage Month! Visit our web page for resources on related records and how we are commemorating the month. Today’s post comes from Kathleen Brown, an archivist in the Textual Processing unit at the National Archives in College Park, Maryland. She is also co-chair of the Hispanic and Latino Organization (HALO) Employee Affinity … Continue reading Hispanic and Latino Organization (HALO) at the National Archives

A Constitution Day reminder

Dear Federal Colleagues—on Constitution Day we here at the National Archives are happily tasked with promoting the United States Constitution . . . and you are too! Why? Because of an act of Congress that was the brainchild of Senator Robert C. Byrd (1917–2010). Senator Byrd loved the Constitution. He studied it in college. He … Continue reading A Constitution Day reminder

George Mason and the origins of the Bill of Rights

Today’s post comes from Austin McManus with the National Archives History Office. Come see our traveling exhibition, "Amending America: The Bill of Rights," at George Mason's Gunston Hall through October 21, 2017. One of the documents on display in the Rotunda in the National Archives is the Bill of Rights, the first 10 amendments to the … Continue reading George Mason and the origins of the Bill of Rights