Unratified Amendments: The Equal Rights Amendment

This is the fifth installment of a series about unratified constitutional amendments. Today we’re looking at an amendment that was first introduced nearly 100 years ago and we’re still talking about today: The Equal Rights Amendment. The Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) is a proposed constitutional amendment that would guarantee equal rights under the law regardless … Continue reading Unratified Amendments: The Equal Rights Amendment

Wear a Mask and Save Your Life: the 1918 Flu Pandemic

This post, by Megan Huang in the National Archives History Office, was originally published in 2018 marking the centenary of the 1918 influenza. It has been updated with additional images. Masks as protection against influenza. Street cleaner wearing the influenza mask, 10/16/1918. (National Archives Identifier 45499357) The 1918 influenza pandemic was a pandemic in the … Continue reading Wear a Mask and Save Your Life: the 1918 Flu Pandemic

The Death of a President

April 12 marks the 75th anniversary of the death of President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Today’s post comes from Michael J. Hancock, archives technician at the National Archives at College Park, MD. “We have always held to the hope, the belief, the conviction, that there is a better life, a better world, beyond the horizon.” —Franklin … Continue reading The Death of a President

New York City U.S. Custom House Employee: Matthew Henson

Today’s post comes from Dorothy Dougherty, Programs Director at the National Archives at New York City. Matthew Henson, the famous African American explorer, worked nearly 20 years with Admiral Robert Peary exploring the Arctic. On April 6, 1909, Henson and Peary successfully made it to the North Pole, where Henson is credited with placing the U.S. … Continue reading New York City U.S. Custom House Employee: Matthew Henson

Facial Hair Friday: Duke Ellington

April is Jazz Appreciation Month, and today’s Facial Hair Friday honors Washington, DC’s very own mustachioed jazz man: Duke Ellington.  Born Edward Kennedy Ellington on April 29, 1899, in Washington, DC, Duke Ellington was the greatest jazz composer, pianist, and bandleader of his time. His career spanned more than six decades during which he composed … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: Duke Ellington

19th Amendment at 100: Mary Louise Bottineau Baldwin

The 19th Amendment was ratified in 1920, but this landmark event was neither the beginning nor the end of the story for women and their struggle for the right to vote. Join us in 2020 as we commemorate this centennial year with 12 stories from our holdings for you to save, print, or share. April’s featured image is of … Continue reading 19th Amendment at 100: Mary Louise Bottineau Baldwin