The World War II-Era Actress Who Invented Wi-Fi: Hedy Lamarr

Today's post come from Lori Norris, an archives technician a the National Archives at College Park. As we face the uncertainty of the current COVID-19 pandemic, one helpful invention has eased the anxieties of staying at home and assists us daily with our new teleworking lives. Wi-Fi, or wireless fidelity, allows us to stay plugged … Continue reading The World War II-Era Actress Who Invented Wi-Fi: Hedy Lamarr

Asian/Pacific American History: Learning our Legacy

May is Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month. Visit the National Archives website to learn more about related records and resources. APA Heritage Month is an opportunity to...contribute to the wider understanding of what it means to be an American. - Alex Villaseran, archives technician and APA Unity co-chair Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month was … Continue reading Asian/Pacific American History: Learning our Legacy

Is it Governor’s Island or Governors Island?

Today's post comes from John LeGloahec, an archives specialist with the Electronic Records Reference Services at the National Archives. Recently the Electronic Records Division has made available, through the National Archives Catalog, the scanned images of Governors Island Maps and Plans and Architectural and Engineering Drawings, which comprises more than 11,000 Tagged Image Format Files … Continue reading Is it Governor’s Island or Governors Island?

Letter from Harriet B. Denby, Augusta, Ga. to “Dear Mother,” September 22, 1864

Today’s post comes from Dorothy Dougherty, Programs Director at the National Archives at New York City. “Dear Mother,” starts the letter from Harriet B. Denby, to her mother-in-law, Elizabeth Denby of Augusta, Georgia. This beautiful handwritten four-page letter reminds us about compassion, gratitude, and the enduring lessons mothers teach us about love.  Letter from Harriet … Continue reading Letter from Harriet B. Denby, Augusta, Ga. to “Dear Mother,” September 22, 1864

19th Amendment at 100: Mabel Ping-Hua Lee

The 19th Amendment was ratified in 1920, but this landmark event was neither the beginning nor the end of the story for women and their struggle for the right to vote. Join us in 2020 as we commemorate this centennial year with 12 stories from our holdings for you to save, print, or share. May’s featured image is of Mabel … Continue reading 19th Amendment at 100: Mabel Ping-Hua Lee

FOUND: Civil War Pension file for the “Lost Soldier of Chickamauga”

National Archives News recently posted a two-part story on the Civil War pension file of Hugh Thompson, the “Lost Soldier of Chickamauga.” Today’s post, from Dena Lombardo, an intern in the Public and Media Communications office, tells more of the story.    Recently, National Archives staff uncovered the largest Civil War pension file in our holdings. … Continue reading FOUND: Civil War Pension file for the “Lost Soldier of Chickamauga”

Facial Hair Friday: On the Trail of Otto Von Bismarck

Otto Von Bismarck is known for unifying Germany in 1871 and serving as its first chancellor. Before unification, the region was a collection of small German-speaking states. As chancellor, Bismarck focused on building a powerful united country with a strong national identity, thus making the new Germany a major European powerhouse. He was in office … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: On the Trail of Otto Von Bismarck