January 18, 1964 – Martin Luther King, Jr. & LBJ

Martin Luther King, Jr., would have been 82 on January 15, and yesterday we observed the national holiday in his honor. The above photograph shows a January 18, 1964, White House meeting between four civil rights leaders—Roy Wilkins, James Farmer, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Whitney Young—and President Lyndon Johnson. A civil rights bill was stuck in the … Continue reading January 18, 1964 – Martin Luther King, Jr. & LBJ

We Remember Civil Rights Legend John Lewis

Today’s post comes from Miriam Kleiman, Public Affairs Specialist at the National Archives. There is perhaps no single figure whose own life and career embodies the promise, success, and continued challenges of civil rights for Black Americans than John Lewis. We mourn this tremendous loss and look back on his incredible history through our holdings … Continue reading We Remember Civil Rights Legend John Lewis

The National Archives and 1968: A Year of Triumph and Tragedy

Today’s post comes from Kerri Lawrence, Writer-Editor for the National Archives News. This year marks the 50th anniversary of 1968, a year of turmoil and change in the United States and the world.   In reflection, 1968 was a year of triumph and tragedy. International and national events changed the landscape of America and the world around … Continue reading The National Archives and 1968: A Year of Triumph and Tragedy

LBJ and MLK

We are wrapping up our commemoration of Black History Month. Today’s post comes from Madie Ward in the National Archives History Office. The National Archives has countless items that highlight African Americans’ struggles for freedom and civil liberties. Included are documents on the Civil Rights Movement and, more specifically, on President Lyndon B. Johnson and Dr. … Continue reading LBJ and MLK

The “EP” at the National Archives

On January 1, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation (what some of us here at the Archives call the “EP”)—in the middle of the U.S. Civil War. In it, he declared all slaves within the states that were currently in rebellion to be free. Although it did not abolish slavery altogether, the document … Continue reading The “EP” at the National Archives

From 1600 to 700 Pennsylvania Avenue: Presidential Visits to the National Archives

Since the National Archives was established more than 80 years ago, millions of people from the United States and abroad have visited our historic building in Washington, DC. Ten of those visitors were sitting U.S. Presidents. In 1933, before there was a building, President Herbert Hoover became the first President to visit when he laid … Continue reading From 1600 to 700 Pennsylvania Avenue: Presidential Visits to the National Archives

The drawings of Charles Alston

February is Black History Month! Visit the National Archives website to learn more about our many events and activities celebrating African American History. Charles Henry Alston (November 28, 1907–April 27, 1977) was a noted African American artist and teacher. He is best known for sculpting the bust of Martin Luther King, Jr., on display in the … Continue reading The drawings of Charles Alston

The Wild, Wild West . . . of Pennsylvania Avenue

We are wrapping up our celebration of Black History Month. Today’s post comes from Hailey Philbin. On a sunny day in 1944, young Sara Jackson walked along the noisy DC streets right into the National Archives and asked for a job. It wasn’t very often that someone walked in from the street asking for a … Continue reading The Wild, Wild West . . . of Pennsylvania Avenue

The Montgomery Bus Boycott

In commemoration of the anniversary of the Montgomery Bus Boycott, today’s post comes from Sarah Basilion, an intern in the National Archives History Office. Sixty years ago, Rosa Parks, a 42-year-old black woman, refused to give up her seat to a white passenger on a Montgomery, Alabama, public bus. On December 1, 1955, Parks, a seamstress … Continue reading The Montgomery Bus Boycott