Author Archives: jessiekratz

UFOs: Natural Explanations

Today’s post comes from Joseph Gillette, an archivist on a cross-training assignment in the National Archives History Office. This is the second in a series concerning the Air Force’s Project Blue Book investigation. From 1947 to 1970, the United States … Continue reading

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The Jefferson Memorial turns 75

On Friday, April 13, 2018, the memorial dedicated to Thomas Jefferson—our third President and principal author of the Declaration of Independence—turns 75.   The memorial’s architect, John Russell Pope (1874–1937), was also architect of the National Archives Building. While Pope lived … Continue reading

Posted in - Declaration of Independence, National Archives History, News and Events, Presidents | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

INVASION! (of privacy)

Today’s post comes from Joseph Gillette, an archivist on a cross-training assignment with the National Archives History Office. It is part of a series concerning the Air Force’s Project Blue Book investigation. In the mid-1970s, the National Archives prepared to … Continue reading

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Betty Ford Danced To Her Own Beat

We’re wrapping up Women’s History Month. Today’s post comes from Anayeli Nunez at the National Archives History Office. In 1987, Congress declared March National Women’s History Month. Today we use this month to honor women, from the suffragists of the 19th Amendment … Continue reading

Posted in - Women's Rights, Women's History Month | Tagged | 1 Comment

Play Ball!

Opening day of baseball is upon us, and believe it or not, the National Archives is full of records related to America’s favorite pastime. For instance, within the Records of the United States Senate at the Center for Legislative Archives … Continue reading

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Change at their fingertips: Women’s petitions to Congress

March is Women’s History Month. Today’s post comes from Melanie M. Griffin from the National Archives Education and Public Programs Office. Often when one thinks of the freedoms embedded in the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, one doesn’t immediately think … Continue reading

Posted in - Women's Rights, petitions, Women's History Month | 1 Comment

Eugenie Anderson’s Historic Firsts

Today’s post comes from John P. Blair with the National Archives History Office. The observance of Women’s History Month prompts us to explore the lives and experiences of some of the many female trailblazers in our nation’s history. One such … Continue reading

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Annie Oakley: A Woman to be Reckoned With

March is Women’s History Month! Today’s post comes from Madie Ward in the National Archives History Office. Among the billions of documents in the National Archives, Archivist of the United States David Ferriero has a favorite: the 1898 letter from … Continue reading

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Morgantown Ordnance Works Panoramas, 1940-1942

Today’s post comes from Nicholas Novine, a processing intern at the National Archives at Philadelphia. We are pleased to announce that a series of 91 panoramas documenting industrial developments of the Morgantown Ordnance Works at Morgantown, West Virginia have been … Continue reading

Posted in - World War II, National Archives Near You, Rare Photos | 4 Comments

Andrew Johnson: Path to Impeachment

Today’s post comes from Tom Eisinger, an archivist in the Center for Legislative Archives at the National Archives in Washington, DC. It is part one of a two-part series on the impeachment of President Andrew Johnson. Politics were unsettled during … Continue reading

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