Explore “Our Neighborhood”

The National Archives History Office has published a new online exhibit, "The History of Our Neighborhood." Today's post comes from Rachel Rosenfeld from the National Archives History Office. The National Archives Building in Washington, DC, sits halfway between the Capitol and the White House on Pennsylvania Avenue, but the building wasn’t always there. In fact, … Continue reading Explore “Our Neighborhood”

National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers

November 11 is Veterans Day. Visit the National Archives website to learn more about our resources and events related to the holiday. Today’s post comes from Shannon O'Malley, a Digitization and Metadata Intern at the National Archives at Philadelphia.  President Abraham Lincoln signed the bipartisan bill establishing the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers in March 1865. … Continue reading National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers

Susan B. Anthony: Women’s Right to Vote

The National Archives is celebrating the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment with the exhibit Rightfully Hers: American Women and the Vote, which runs in the Lawrence F. O’Brien Gallery of the National Archives in Washington, DC, through January 3, 2021. Today’s post comes from Michael J. Hancock in the National Archives History Office. Susan B. … Continue reading Susan B. Anthony: Women’s Right to Vote

Nats Win!

Congratulations to our hometown team, the Washington Nationals, for winning the 2019 World Series! After a series of heartbreaking losses in past qualifying rounds, the Nats finally broke through, capping a miraculous run through the playoffs with a nail-biting game seven win. Combining MVP Steven Strasburg's pitching, Howie Kendrick's perfectly timed home runs, and manager … Continue reading Nats Win!

Facial Hair Friday: M=Mustache

Join @USNatArchives today on Twitter for our #ArchivesFacialHair Hashtag Party. Today's post comes from Vincent Bartholomew from the National Archives History Office. Albert Einstein, 1936. (National Archives Identifier 596270) German-born and Swiss-educated theoretical physicist Albert Einstein is possibly best known for his mass—energy equivalence formula, E = MC2  (Energy = Mass x Speed of Light2), … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: M=Mustache

The Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House and the National Archives at New York City

The National Archives is celebrating American Archives Month throughout October. Follow us on social media, and share your archives stories using the hashtag #ArchivesMonth. Today's post comes from Michael J. Hancock from the National Archives History Office. The National Archives History Office has published a new online exhibit, The Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House and the … Continue reading The Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House and the National Archives at New York City

The Maker of Pilots: Aviator and Civil Rights Activist Willa Beatrice Brown

Today's post comes from Jennifer Johnson, a curator at the National Archives at Kansas City. Willa Beatrice Brown is featured in the nationwide traveling exhibit One Half of the People: Advancing Equality for Women. Perhaps one of the less recognizable names, but certainly as noteworthy, she was a woman who achieved great success despite limited … Continue reading The Maker of Pilots: Aviator and Civil Rights Activist Willa Beatrice Brown

Pictographs, Petroglyphs, “Rock Art,” What is the difference?

The National Archives is celebrating American Archives Month throughout October. Follow us on social media and share your archives stories using the hashtag #ArchivesMonth. Today's post comes from Larry Shockley, an archives specialist at the National Archives at College Park, MD.  The National Archives' holdings offer many keys to understanding our past. With a simple search … Continue reading Pictographs, Petroglyphs, “Rock Art,” What is the difference?

Woodstock: Three days of Peace, Music, and Toilets

Woodstock was a three-day music festival held in Bethel, New York, August 15–18, 1969. Plagued by poor planning and bad weather, the expected audience of 100,000 ballooned to over 400,000. There wasn’t enough food, water, or bathrooms, and frequent rains turned the festival’s picturesque farmland into a field of knee-deep mud. Though a logistical and … Continue reading Woodstock: Three days of Peace, Music, and Toilets

Facial Hair Friday: John Brown

Today is Facial Hair Friday, and we’re looking back at abolitionist John Brown. Today’s post comes from Vincent Bartholomew in the National Archives History Office. John Brown, ca. 1858. (National Archives Identifier 23855306) Abolitionist John Brown, who was previously clean shaven, grew a robust beard during his preparations for the raid on Harpers Ferry as … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: John Brown