Author Archives: jessiekratz

The Doolittle Raid: America’s First Strike Back on Japan

Today’s post comes from Jim Worsham, editor of Prologue, the quarterly magazine of the National Archives. Four months after Japan’s surprise attack at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, the aircraft carrier USS Hornet sailed under the Golden Gate Bridge and out of … Continue reading

Posted in - World War II | 2 Comments

From 1600 to 700 Pennsylvania Avenue: Presidential Visits to the National Archives

Since the National Archives was established more than 80 years ago, millions of people from the United States and abroad have visited our historic building in Washington, DC. Ten of those visitors were sitting U.S. Presidents. In 1933, before there … Continue reading

Posted in - Constitution, - Declaration of Independence, - Presidents, - World War II, Bill of Rights, National Archives History | 1 Comment

Solon Buck Portrait

In the National Archives Building in Washington, DC, hang portraits of the first nine Archivists of the United States, and Waldo Gifford Leland, who was instrumental in the agency’s creation. Sharing a wall with Leland and the first U.S. Archivist … Continue reading

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U.S. Entry into the War to End All Wars

2017 marks the 100th anniversary of U.S. entry into World War I. Visit the National Archives website to learn how the National Archives is commemorating the anniversary. Today’s post comes from Sonia Kahn in the National Archives History Office.  Two and … Continue reading

Posted in - World War I, News and Events, U.S. House, U.S. Senate | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Original Alaska Purchase Documents travel to the Anchorage Museum

This year marks the 150th anniversary of the Alaska Purchase. To celebrate, the National Archives at Seattle has added 150 images from the Alaska Digitization Project to their Flickr gallery.  Today’s post comes from Jim Zeender, Senior Registrar in the … Continue reading

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What’s Your Story, Adelaide Minogue?

March is Women’s History Month! Visit our website for more resources on women’s history and to see how the National Archives is celebrating the month. Today’s post comes from Alan Walker, an archivist in Textual Processing at Archives II. I am flabbergasted at how … Continue reading

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On Exhibit: the Indian Removal Act

In the early 19th century, American demand for Indian nations’ land increased, and momentum grew to force Indians further west. The first major step to relocate American Indians came when Congress passed, and President Andrew Jackson signed, the Indian Removal … Continue reading

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SNAC: Connecting Archival Collections

Today’s post comes from Dina Herbert, the National Archives Liaison to Social Networks and Archival Context (SNAC).  History buffs love trivia and making connections between historical figures. Like, how many degrees of separation are there between George Washington and Albert … Continue reading

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Women’s History in the Archives

March is Women’s History Month! Today’s post comes from Elle Benak in the National Archives History Office. In spring 1976 the National Archives held a ground-breaking conference on women’s history. It highlighted National Archives records that focused on the subject … Continue reading

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The drawings of Charles Alston

February is Black History Month! Visit the National Archives website to learn more about our many events and activities celebrating African American History. Charles Henry Alston (November 28, 1907–April 27, 1977) was a noted African American artist and teacher. He is … Continue reading

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