Celebrating 10 million patents

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office will issue the 10 millionth utility patent on Tuesday, June 19, 2018. This is a historic milestone for the agency and for inventors in the United States. Use the hashtag #10MillionPatents to join the celebration. Today's post comes from Danielle Sklarew, an intern in the National Archives History Office. It's … Continue reading Celebrating 10 million patents

American Pride for Astronaut Sally Ride

Today’s Pride Month post comes from Danielle Sklarew, an intern in the National Archives History Office. On June 18, 1983, Dr. Sally Ride zoomed away from earth on a NASA Space Shuttle, breaking barriers as she reached immense heights. As Ride embarked on this mission, she officially became the first American woman to fly in … Continue reading American Pride for Astronaut Sally Ride

A Very Presidential Father’s Day

In honor of Father’s Day, we are taking a look at some of the most well-known fathers in our country’s history: the Presidents of the United States! Today’s post comes from Danielle Sklarew, an intern in the National Archives History Office. Gerald Ford playing with son Michael President Gerald Ford had four children. Here he … Continue reading A Very Presidential Father’s Day

Do you have World Cup fever?!

Today’s post celebrates the international sporting event that captivates billions of people every four years: the FIFA World Cup! Every four years we get to experience the biggest sporting event on the planet and watch the very best of the beautiful game. Sadly, the U.S. national team did not qualify for the 2018 World Cup … Continue reading Do you have World Cup fever?!

USCIS and the Legacy of Ellis Island

Today's post comes from Allison Finkelstein, a historian with the U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services History Office and Library. The USCIS History Office and Library recently released a new documentary film project, USCIS and the Legacy of Ellis Island. From 1892 to 1954, the federal immigration service and its employees processed more than 12 million … Continue reading USCIS and the Legacy of Ellis Island

Alexander Hamilton: “I just need to write something down.”

I will always take advantage of any opportunity to promote Alexander Hamilton, and this June I have the perfect one. In conjunction with the three-month showing of Hamilton the musical in Washington, DC, this summer (and yes, I have tickets), we’re having a special exhibit of Hamilton-related documents in the East Rotunda Gallery of the National Archives … Continue reading Alexander Hamilton: “I just need to write something down.”

June 9 is International Archives Day!

Participate in a Worldwide Archives Celebration! Visit the National Archives Museum and join us for family-friendly archival activities in the Boeing Learning Center in Washington, DC. Today's post comes from Meg Phillips, the National Archives External Affairs Liaison. On Saturday, June 9, the National Archives joins with archives around the world to celebrate International Archives Day. This day … Continue reading June 9 is International Archives Day!

The National Archives and 1968: A Year of Triumph and Tragedy

Today's post comes from Kerri Lawrence, Writer-Editor for the National Archives News. This year marks the 50th anniversary of 1968, a year of turmoil and change in the United States and the world.   In reflection, 1968 was a year of triumph and tragedy. International and national events changed the landscape of America and the world around … Continue reading The National Archives and 1968: A Year of Triumph and Tragedy

Facial Hair Friday Returns!

Whether it be beards, mustaches, burnsides, goatees, sideburns, or the good ol’ mutton chops, every first Friday of the month we’ll bring you the finest facial hair from the holdings of National Archives. Why are we bringing back Facial Hair Friday? It is fate—two recent posts had photos of John Alexander Logan, and while looking at … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday Returns!

The Nation’s Sacrifice: The Origins and Evolution of Memorial Day

Today’s post comes from John P. Blair with the National Archives History Office. On May 28, 2018, our nation observes a federal holiday—Memorial Day—that was signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson on June 28, 1968, to take effect on January 1, 1971. Yes, officially Memorial Day as a legal national holiday is only 50 years … Continue reading The Nation’s Sacrifice: The Origins and Evolution of Memorial Day