Jackie Robinson’s 100th

We're wrapping up African American History Month. Visit the National Archives website for more information on our resources related to African American History. Today’s post comes from James Worsham, editor in the Communications and Marketing Division of the National Archives. Jackie Robinson, the first African American to play in modern major league baseball, would have been 100 … Continue reading Jackie Robinson’s 100th

The “Roots” of Genealogy at the National Archives

February is African American History Month. Visit the National Archives website for more information on our resources related to African American History. In 1964, writer and historian Alex Haley visited the National Archives to research his family history. Looking in the 1870 census records for Alamance County, NC, he was able to confirm some details he heard … Continue reading The “Roots” of Genealogy at the National Archives

Reaching Communities: National Archives Traveling Exhibits Service

Today’s post comes from Jennifer Johnson, curator in the National Archives Traveling Exhibits Service (NATES). On December 21, 2018, NATES program manager Dee Harris and I went to the Topeka and Shawnee County Public Library in Topeka, Kansas, where one of our traveling exhibits, “Over There” was on display in the Alice C. Sabatini Gallery. … Continue reading Reaching Communities: National Archives Traveling Exhibits Service

Facial Hair Friday: Joseph Rainey the first African American in the House

  Joseph Rainey was distinguished in many ways—he was the first African American to serve in the U.S. House of Representatives, the first African American to preside over the House of Representatives, and the longest–serving African American during Reconstruction. He also had pretty nice mutton chops. Rainey was born into slavery in 1832 in Georgetown, … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: Joseph Rainey the first African American in the House

Shirley Chisholm: Unbought and Unbossed

This year marks the 50th anniversary of Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm’s swearing-in as the first African American woman in Congress. To commemorate the historic event, the National Archives is having a special document exhibit in the East Rotunda Gallery of the National Archives Building in Washington, DC, through April 3, 2019. Today’s post comes from Michael … Continue reading Shirley Chisholm: Unbought and Unbossed

Mr. and Mrs. Claus Were Not Communists

Today's post comes from Alan Walker, an archivist at the National Archives at College Park. Ha, you probably thought I was speaking of that jolly old elf and the missus. Nope. This story begins in 1936, soon after the publication of what would become a standard: Consumers Union Reports. It was the first publication devoted … Continue reading Mr. and Mrs. Claus Were Not Communists

Notorious RBG at the National Archives

This year we have Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s returning to the National Archives on December 14, 2018, for our annual Bill of Rights Day naturalization ceremony. Today's post comes from Danielle Sklarew in the National Archives History Office. When Ruth Bader Ginsburg visited the National Archives on August 26, 1993—16 days after she … Continue reading Notorious RBG at the National Archives

My Fellow Americans: Bill of Rights Day at the National Archives

December 15 is Bill of Rights Day, which commemorates the ratification of the first 10 amendments to the U.S. Constitution. For more information on events and resources at the National Archives, visit our Bill of Rights Day website. "I hereby declare, on oath, that I absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity … Continue reading My Fellow Americans: Bill of Rights Day at the National Archives