Letter from Harriet B. Denby, Augusta, Ga. to “Dear Mother,” September 22, 1864

Today’s post comes from Dorothy Dougherty, Programs Director at the National Archives at New York City. “Dear Mother,” starts the letter from Harriet B. Denby, to her mother-in-law, Elizabeth Denby of Augusta, Georgia. This beautiful handwritten four-page letter reminds us about compassion, gratitude, and the enduring lessons mothers teach us about love.  Letter from Harriet … Continue reading Letter from Harriet B. Denby, Augusta, Ga. to “Dear Mother,” September 22, 1864

FOUND: Civil War Pension file for the “Lost Soldier of Chickamauga”

National Archives News recently posted a two-part story on the Civil War pension file of Hugh Thompson, the “Lost Soldier of Chickamauga.” Today’s post, from Dena Lombardo, an intern in the Public and Media Communications office, tells more of the story.    Recently, National Archives staff uncovered the largest Civil War pension file in our holdings. … Continue reading FOUND: Civil War Pension file for the “Lost Soldier of Chickamauga”

Facial Hair Friday: On the Trail of Otto Von Bismarck

Otto Von Bismarck is known for unifying Germany in 1871 and serving as its first chancellor. Before unification, the region was a collection of small German-speaking states. As chancellor, Bismarck focused on building a powerful united country with a strong national identity, thus making the new Germany a major European powerhouse. He was in office … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: On the Trail of Otto Von Bismarck

Unratified Amendments: The Equal Rights Amendment

This is the fifth installment of a series about unratified constitutional amendments. Today we’re looking at an amendment that was first introduced nearly 100 years ago and we’re still talking about today: The Equal Rights Amendment. The Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) is a proposed constitutional amendment that would guarantee equal rights under the law regardless … Continue reading Unratified Amendments: The Equal Rights Amendment

Wear a Mask and Save Your Life: the 1918 Flu Pandemic

This post, by Megan Huang in the National Archives History Office, was originally published in 2018 marking the centenary of the 1918 influenza. It has been updated with additional images. Masks as protection against influenza. Street cleaner wearing the influenza mask, 10/16/1918. (National Archives Identifier 45499357) The 1918 influenza pandemic was a pandemic in the … Continue reading Wear a Mask and Save Your Life: the 1918 Flu Pandemic

The Death of a President

April 12 marks the 75th anniversary of the death of President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Today’s post comes from Michael J. Hancock, archives technician at the National Archives at College Park, MD. “We have always held to the hope, the belief, the conviction, that there is a better life, a better world, beyond the horizon.” —Franklin … Continue reading The Death of a President

New York City U.S. Custom House Employee: Matthew Henson

Today’s post comes from Dorothy Dougherty, Programs Director at the National Archives at New York City. Matthew Henson, the famous African American explorer, worked nearly 20 years with Admiral Robert Peary exploring the Arctic. On April 6, 1909, Henson and Peary successfully made it to the North Pole, where Henson is credited with placing the U.S. … Continue reading New York City U.S. Custom House Employee: Matthew Henson

Facial Hair Friday: Duke Ellington

April is Jazz Appreciation Month, and today’s Facial Hair Friday honors Washington, DC’s very own mustachioed jazz man: Duke Ellington.  Born Edward Kennedy Ellington on April 29, 1899, in Washington, DC, Duke Ellington was the greatest jazz composer, pianist, and bandleader of his time. His career spanned more than six decades during which he composed … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: Duke Ellington

Mae Jemison: First Black Woman in Space

March is Women’s History Month. Visit the National Archives website for resources related to women’s history. Today's post comes from Dena Lombardo, an intern in the Public and Media Communications office. When the space shuttle Endeavour blasted off on its second mission in 1992, it carried the first African American woman into space. But Mae … Continue reading Mae Jemison: First Black Woman in Space

Unratified Amendments: Regulating Child Labor

This is the fourth installment of a series about unratified constitutional amendments. Today we’re looking at an amendment proposed during the Progressive Era to regulate child labor. During the Progressive Era, muckraking journalists and photographers drew public attention to a myriad of America’s social problems, one of them being the exploitation of children. Perhaps most … Continue reading Unratified Amendments: Regulating Child Labor