Tag Archives: guest post

Documerica: Seeing the Seventies More Clearly

Today’s blog post comes from Hannah Fenster, summer intern with the Public Affairs Office. Ever wonder why your photographs of the 1970s are slowly changing color? Hint: They don’t want makeovers or need more fuchsia in their lives. More likely, … Continue reading

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Enemy Aliens in Kansas City

Today’s post comes from Kimberlee Ried, public programs specialist at the National Archives in Kansas City, MO. After war was declared by Congress in April 1917, non-naturalized “enemy aliens” were required to register with the Department of Justice as a … Continue reading

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Facial Hair Friday: Herman Haupt’s Success Proportional to the Size of His Beard

Today’s blog post comes from Hannah Fenster, summer intern in the Public Affairs Office of the National Archives. Herman Haupt wasn’t hurting for hair. Or confidence. The scruff that framed his face and eyes contributed to his imposing persona—which was … Continue reading

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Minnie Spotted Wolf and the Marine Corps

Today’s blog post comes from Cody White, archivist at the National Archives in Denver. It was 70 years ago this month that the first Native American woman, Minnie Spotted Wolf, enlisted in the United States Marine Corps Women’s Reserve. Born … Continue reading

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The 150th anniversary of Pickett’s Charge

Today’s guest post comes from Robert Lee Tringali, program analyst at the National Archives. Starting on July 1, the last three days have marked the sesquicentennial anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg, the turning point of the Civil War. In … Continue reading

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My name is Harvey Milk—and I want to recruit you.

Today’s blog post comes from Michael Hussey, education and exhibit specialist at the National Archives. What do Sean Penn and Ronald Reagan have in common? Probably not a whole lot besides Harvey Milk. In 2008, Penn played the role of … Continue reading

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Suffrage and suffering at the 1913 March

Today’s blog post comes from Jessie Kratz, archives specialist in the Center for Legislative Archives. If you are participating in the 100th anniversary of the parade on Sunday, stop by the National Archives to see the document that finally gave … Continue reading

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Eisenhower and (Tank) Driver’s Ed

Today’s post comes from Christopher Abraham at the Eisenhower Presidential Library. He answers a question each week on Facebook. This week’s Ask an Archivist query comes from Pennsylvania. “Did Eisenhower teach Patton how to drive a tank at Camp Colt … Continue reading

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A glimpse into the Civil War experience of Company F

Today’s blog post comes from Mary Burtzloff, archivist at the Dwight D. Eisenhower Presidential Library. The black leather-bound journal had water stains and mold around the edges. It looked a bit icky, but the contents of the Civil War journal … Continue reading

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Washington’s first Inaugural Address now on display

“My station is new; and, if I may use the expression, I walk on untrodden ground.” –George Washington in a letter, January 9, 1790 Today’s post comes to us from Michael Hussey, education and exhibition specialist at the National Archives. … Continue reading

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