Putting the “Rat” in Ratification: Tennessee’s role in the 19th amendment

In 1878 Senator Aaron A. Sargent introduced into Congress a resolution proposing a constitutional amendment granting women the right to vote. On June 4, 1919,  after 40 years—and much effort and debate—Congress passed, by a two-thirds vote of both houses, that proposed amendment. It was then up to the states to ratify it.  Many states … Continue reading Putting the “Rat” in Ratification: Tennessee’s role in the 19th amendment

Jeannette Rankin: The woman who voted to give women the right to vote

Today’s post comes from Christine Blackerby, an archives specialist with the Center for Legislative Archives at the National Archives in Washington, DC. 2017 marks the centennial of the swearing-in of the first woman to become a member of the U.S. Congress, Jeannette Rankin (R-Montana). A pacifist and suffragist, Rankin was elected to Congress four years … Continue reading Jeannette Rankin: The woman who voted to give women the right to vote

Ms. Archivist

The National Archives History Office is celebrating Women's History Month by featuring past employees. Today's post comes from Hailey Philbin. “Deutrich’s only disadvantage in this respect lies in her being a woman.” Imagine hearing this and inevitably realizing that your career ambitions would be restricted because of your gender. Mabel Deutrich was given this discriminatory … Continue reading Ms. Archivist

The Wild, Wild West . . . of Pennsylvania Avenue

We are wrapping up our celebration of Black History Month. Today’s post comes from Hailey Philbin. On a sunny day in 1944, young Sara Jackson walked along the noisy DC streets right into the National Archives and asked for a job. It wasn’t very often that someone walked in from the street asking for a … Continue reading The Wild, Wild West . . . of Pennsylvania Avenue

On Exhibit: “Lady Hooch Hunter”

Today's post comes from Zach Kopin, an intern in the National Archives History Office in Washington, DC. A new exhibit on America’s connection to alcohol is now on display at the National Archives. “Spirited Republic: Alcohol and American History” is about the United States’ love-hate relationship with the “demon rum.” Bruce Bustard, the exhibit's curator, … Continue reading On Exhibit: “Lady Hooch Hunter”

Changing the Boundaries: Women at Work in the Government

Today’s post comes from Samantha Payne, intern in the Center for Legislative Archives. in Washington, DC.  On January 29, 1790, Mary Katherine Goddard sent the Senate a singular request: to be reinstated as postmistress of Baltimore. After running the post office for 14 years, and paying post-riders with her own savings during the American Revolution, … Continue reading Changing the Boundaries: Women at Work in the Government

Failure of the Equal Rights Amendment: The Feminist Fight of the 1970s

Today’s post comes from Marisa Hawley, intern in the National Archives Strategy and Communications office. As part of the "six weeks of style" celebration to recognize the Foundation for the National Archives' partnership with DC Fashion Week, we are showcasing fashion-related records from our holdings. This week’s fashion theme is Get Your 1970s Groove On. After the ratification … Continue reading Failure of the Equal Rights Amendment: The Feminist Fight of the 1970s

They “Leaned In” and took action in federal courts

Happy Women's History Month! Today's blog post comes from Kristina Jarosik, education specialist at the National Archives at Chicago. Recently, two powerful women in the Silicon Valley, (Sheryl Sandberg of Facebook and author of Lean In: Women Work and the Will to Lead and Marissa Meyer, CEO of Yahoo) provided the media and the public the … Continue reading They “Leaned In” and took action in federal courts

Suffrage and suffering at the 1913 March

Today's blog post comes from Jessie Kratz, archives specialist in the Center for Legislative Archives. As woman suffrage advocates marched along Pennsylvania Avenue on March 3, 1913, they were met with crowds of unruly men blocking their paths and shouting derogatory remarks. While making preparations for the parade, organizers had made repeated attempts to secure … Continue reading Suffrage and suffering at the 1913 March

The 19th Amendment on display at the National Archives

The 19th Amendment is on display from March 1 to March 8 at the National Archives Building in honor of the 100th anniversary of the 1913 woman's suffrage parade in Washington, DC. We will also be screening the 2004 film "Iron-Jawed Angels" at noon on March 2. Today's guest post is from curator Bruce Bustard. … Continue reading The 19th Amendment on display at the National Archives