The National Archives and 1968: A Year of Triumph and Tragedy

Today's post comes from Kerri Lawrence, Writer-Editor for the National Archives News. This year marks the 50th anniversary of 1968, a year of turmoil and change in the United States and the world.   In reflection, 1968 was a year of triumph and tragedy. International and national events changed the landscape of America and the world around … Continue reading The National Archives and 1968: A Year of Triumph and Tragedy

Betty Ford, Dancer

April 8, 2018, marks the 100th anniversary of Betty Ford's birth. Today's post comes from Nikita Buley, a former intern at the National Archives.  Betty Ford was known as a vivacious activist for women's rights. What many don’t know is that she was also a talented modern dancer. Born Elizabeth Bloomer, the future First Lady … Continue reading Betty Ford, Dancer

Betty Ford Danced To Her Own Beat

We're wrapping up Women's History Month. Today’s post comes from Anayeli Nunez at the National Archives History Office. In 1987, Congress declared March National Women’s History Month. Today we use this month to honor women, from the suffragists of the 19th Amendment to today’s proud supporters of the #MeToo movement.  It's also a fitting time to look … Continue reading Betty Ford Danced To Her Own Beat

Change at their fingertips: Women’s petitions to Congress

March is Women's History Month. Today’s post comes from Melanie M. Griffin from the National Archives Education and Public Programs Office. Often when one thinks of the freedoms embedded in the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, one doesn't immediately think of the right to petition. A petition is a plea from an individual or a … Continue reading Change at their fingertips: Women’s petitions to Congress

Annie Oakley: A Woman to be Reckoned With

March is Women’s History Month! Today’s post comes from Madie Ward in the National Archives History Office. Among the billions of documents in the National Archives, Archivist of the United States David Ferriero has a favorite: the 1898 letter from Annie Oakley to President William McKinley offering 50 American lady sharpshooters in the Spanish-American War. … Continue reading Annie Oakley: A Woman to be Reckoned With

Putting the “Rat” in Ratification: Tennessee’s role in the 19th amendment

In 1878 Senator Aaron A. Sargent introduced into Congress a resolution proposing a constitutional amendment granting women the right to vote. On June 4, 1919,  after 40 years—and much effort and debate—Congress passed, by a two-thirds vote of both houses, that proposed amendment. It was then up to the states to ratify it.  Many states … Continue reading Putting the “Rat” in Ratification: Tennessee’s role in the 19th amendment

Jeannette Rankin: The woman who voted to give women the right to vote

Today’s post comes from Christine Blackerby, an archives specialist with the Center for Legislative Archives at the National Archives in Washington, DC. 2017 marks the centennial of the swearing-in of the first woman to become a member of the U.S. Congress, Jeannette Rankin (R-Montana). A pacifist and suffragist, Rankin was elected to Congress four years … Continue reading Jeannette Rankin: The woman who voted to give women the right to vote

Ms. Archivist

The National Archives History Office is celebrating Women's History Month by featuring past employees. Today's post comes from Hailey Philbin. “Deutrich’s only disadvantage in this respect lies in her being a woman.” Imagine hearing this and inevitably realizing that your career ambitions would be restricted because of your gender. Mabel Deutrich was given this discriminatory … Continue reading Ms. Archivist

The Wild, Wild West . . . of Pennsylvania Avenue

We are wrapping up our celebration of Black History Month. Today’s post comes from Hailey Philbin. On a sunny day in 1944, young Sara Jackson walked along the noisy DC streets right into the National Archives and asked for a job. It wasn’t very often that someone walked in from the street asking for a … Continue reading The Wild, Wild West . . . of Pennsylvania Avenue

On Exhibit: “Lady Hooch Hunter”

Today's post comes from Zach Kopin, an intern in the National Archives History Office in Washington, DC. A new exhibit on America’s connection to alcohol is now on display at the National Archives. “Spirited Republic: Alcohol and American History” is about the United States’ love-hate relationship with the “demon rum.” Bruce Bustard, the exhibit's curator, … Continue reading On Exhibit: “Lady Hooch Hunter”