One Giant Leap: The Apollo Space Program at 50

Today’s post comes from Garet Anderson-Lind from the National Archives History Office. Fifty years ago, one of the greatest enterprises in human history began: the Apollo Space Program. Through the collective effort of a nation, it was going to put a man on the Moon. While many here in the United States are aware of … Continue reading One Giant Leap: The Apollo Space Program at 50

Celebrating JFK

May 29, 2017, marks the 100th anniversary of John F. Kennedy’s birth. Visit our JFK Centennial web page to celebrate the life and legacy of the 35th President of the United States. The John F. Kennedy Library didn’t open for more than 15 years after the President’s death. It was originally supposed to have been … Continue reading Celebrating JFK

A Call to Public Service: the Peace Corps

This May we celebrate both Public Service Recognition Week and the centennial of the birth of a President closely associated with public service: John F. Kennedy.    In Kennedy’s first inaugural address, in 1961, he made his famous call to public service by asking Americans “to ask not what your country can do for you—ask what … Continue reading A Call to Public Service: the Peace Corps

The 25th Amendment: Succession of the Presidency

Today's post comes from Christine Blackerby, archives specialist in the Center for Legislative Archives at the National Archives in Washington, DC. She is also co-curator of the exhibit “Amending America,” which runs in the Lawrence F. O’Brien Gallery in the National Archives Building through September 4, 2017. Today marks the 50th anniversary of the ratification of the … Continue reading The 25th Amendment: Succession of the Presidency

Ernest Hemingway and the JFK Library

October is American Archives Month! We're celebrating the work of archivists and the importance of archives with a series of blog posts about the Presidential libraries. The records created by Presidents while in office will become part of the National Archives, and eventually will be used by researchers. Here's how it happens!  Today’s post comes … Continue reading Ernest Hemingway and the JFK Library

Take a break with Presidential vacations!

Need a vacation? This summer, go on a vacation with 13 of our Presidents!  You can choose your own adventure on Instagram and chat with us on Twitter on August 19 using #POTUSvacation.   Vacations are an integral part of Presidential history, a way for Presidents to relax and recharge outside of Washington. Many of … Continue reading Take a break with Presidential vacations!

Amending the Constitution: 100 Days to 200 Years

The Constitution hasn’t changed much since it was adopted in 1787. However, it has been tweaked by 27 amendments—some were ratified in a few months, another took more than two centuries. The ink on the Constitution had barely dried in 1787 when people discovered what it did not say. It did not spell out adequately, … Continue reading Amending the Constitution: 100 Days to 200 Years

Archives Spotlight: The John Fitzegerald Kennedy Library and Museum

Today's post comes from Nikita Buley, an intern in the National Archives Office of Strategy and Communications. The John Fitzgerald Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum is located in Boston. The staff collect, preserve, and make publicly available over 48 million items related to the 35th President. These records include not only JFK’s writings and belongings, … Continue reading Archives Spotlight: The John Fitzegerald Kennedy Library and Museum

Say cheese, Mr. President: White House photographers at the Truman Library

Only 43 men in the history of the United States have held the title of President. That's a fairly small group , smaller than your average NFL team. But smaller still is the group of professionals who have held the title as the President's chief photographer. To date, only nine men have served as the official White … Continue reading Say cheese, Mr. President: White House photographers at the Truman Library

What’s Cooking Wednesday: National Waffle Day

Want a waffle with that earthshake? All Virginia earthquake jokes aside, today is a momentous day indeed. On this day in 1869, Dutch American Cornelius Swarthout of Troy, New York, received a U.S. patent for the first waffle iron. Described as simply a “device to bake waffles,” the waffle iron was heated over a coal … Continue reading What’s Cooking Wednesday: National Waffle Day