USCIS and the Legacy of Ellis Island

Today's post comes from Allison Finkelstein, a historian with the U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services History Office and Library. The USCIS History Office and Library recently released a new documentary film project, USCIS and the Legacy of Ellis Island. From 1892 to 1954, the federal immigration service and its employees processed more than 12 million … Continue reading USCIS and the Legacy of Ellis Island

The 1986 Immigration Act and My Lifetime Relationship with the Lincoln Cottage

Today's post comes from Jim Zeender, Registrar on the National Archives Exhibits Staff.  On June 1, my colleagues Alexis Hill, Warren Halsey, and I culminated about nine months of work with a visit to the Lincoln Cottage on the grounds of the Old Soldiers Home. Terry Boone and Bill Nenichka had participated in previous trips. A … Continue reading The 1986 Immigration Act and My Lifetime Relationship with the Lincoln Cottage

Fifty Year Later: A Brief History of the Immigration Act of 1965

Today’s post comes from Rebecca Brenner, an intern in the History Office at the National Archives in Washington, D.C. Fifty years ago on October 3, 1965, at the base of the Statue of Liberty, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Immigration Act of 1965 into law. The act was an important milestone in American immigration … Continue reading Fifty Year Later: A Brief History of the Immigration Act of 1965

An A-File helps a journalist fill the gaps in her family story

October is American Archives Month. To celebrate, we are highlighting our staff around the country and their favorite records from the holdings in the National Archives. Today’s staff member is Elizabeth Burnes, an archivist at the National Archives at Kansas City. Her favorite record is the Alien File of Miosche Slodovnik. Here’s Elizabeth’s story: Researchers … Continue reading An A-File helps a journalist fill the gaps in her family story

Records of Rights Vote: The Immigration Act

Cast your vote for the Immigration Act to be displayed first in the new “Records of Rights” gallery. Polls close on November 15! On November 13, 1954, Ellis Island closed. More than 20 million immigrants had been processed through the island station since its opening in 1892. But immigration was still limited. From 1924 until … Continue reading Records of Rights Vote: The Immigration Act

The people are voting. And the winner is . . . up to you!

Today's blog post comes from Bruce Bustard, curator at the National Archives in Washington, DC. “Exercise your right to vote! This time, help shape the new exhibition space at the National Archives.” David S. Ferriero, Archivist of the United States The National Archives invites you to choose an original document for our new exhibition. America’s … Continue reading The people are voting. And the winner is . . . up to you!

Archives Spotlight: San Francisco

Today's post comes from Nikita Buley, an intern in the National Archives Office of Strategy and Communications. The National Archives is on the West Coast, too! The National Archives at San Francisco (located in San Bruno, California) contains over 55,000 cubic feet of Federal records from the 1850s through the 1980s. The records come from … Continue reading Archives Spotlight: San Francisco

Facial Hair Friday: Mustaches and Moral Turpitude

It was a long, hard journey to the United States in the early 20th century, but even a successful voyage did not guarantee that the immigrant would be able to enter or stay. Deportation was a threat. When immigrants were deported, it could be because of serious crime like murder or petty crime like theft. … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: Mustaches and Moral Turpitude

Plucked from our records: Pasquale Taraffo and the Harp Guitar

 Today's post comes from Nikita Buley, an intern in the National Archives Office of Strategy and Communications. “Attachments,” the current exhibit at the National Archives in Washington, DC, tells the stories of some of the millions of people who have entered and left the United States. One visitor, Pasquale Taraffo, came to the United States … Continue reading Plucked from our records: Pasquale Taraffo and the Harp Guitar

An Orphan of the Holocaust

His parents were victims of the Nazis when he was only four, and he and his uncle spent two years hiding in the forests of Poland, waiting until the end of World War II. But the ordeal of Michael Pupa was far from over. He became a “displaced person,” or DP, moving from one DP … Continue reading An Orphan of the Holocaust