The Movement as a Mosaic: Alice Paul and Woman Suffrage

Our new exhibit “Rightfully Hers” opens in the Lawrence F. O’Brien Gallery in the National Archives Building on May 10, 2019. Today’s post comes from Michael J. Hancock in the National Archives History Office. I always feel the movement is a sort of mosaic. Each of us puts in one little stone, and then you get … Continue reading The Movement as a Mosaic: Alice Paul and Woman Suffrage

Dr. Mary E. Walker

March is Women's History Month! Today's post comes from Holly Rivet, an archives technician at the National Archives at St. Louis. Few women became physicians in the 1850s; fewer still served in the Civil War; and only one was awarded the Medal of Honor. Dr. Mary E. Walker was born in 1832 in Oswego, New … Continue reading Dr. Mary E. Walker

Amelia Earhart: Showing What Women Can Do

March is Women’s History Month! Today’s post comes from Danielle Sklarew in the National Archives History Office. Like previous flights, I am undertaking this one solely because I want to, and because I feel that women now and then have to do things to show what women can do. Amelia Earhart sent these words to … Continue reading Amelia Earhart: Showing What Women Can Do

Josephine Cobb’s Discovery of a Lifetime

March is Women’s History Month! Visit National Archives News to see how we're celebrating. Today’s post comes from Michael Hancock in the National Archives History Office. According to the old saying, a picture is worth a thousand words. But in the case of Josephine Cobb and her 1952 discovery in a Civil War–era photograph, it’s worth … Continue reading Josephine Cobb’s Discovery of a Lifetime

Harriet Beecher Stowe: A Fighter for Social Justice

March is Women’s History Month and today is International Women's Day. To celebrate both events we are hosting an #ArchivesHerstory party! Today’s post comes from Michael J. Hancock in the National Archives History Office. Harriet Beecher Stowe was an abolitionist, author, and figure in the woman suffrage movement. Her magnum opus, Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852), was a … Continue reading Harriet Beecher Stowe: A Fighter for Social Justice

Betty Ford Danced To Her Own Beat

We're wrapping up Women's History Month. Today’s post comes from Anayeli Nunez at the National Archives History Office. In 1987, Congress declared March National Women’s History Month. Today we use this month to honor women, from the suffragists of the 19th Amendment to today’s proud supporters of the #MeToo movement.  It's also a fitting time to look … Continue reading Betty Ford Danced To Her Own Beat

Change at their fingertips: Women’s petitions to Congress

March is Women's History Month. Today’s post comes from Melanie M. Griffin from the National Archives Education and Public Programs Office. Often when one thinks of the freedoms embedded in the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, one doesn't immediately think of the right to petition. A petition is a plea from an individual or a … Continue reading Change at their fingertips: Women’s petitions to Congress

Eugenie Anderson’s Historic Firsts

Today’s post comes from John P. Blair with the National Archives History Office. The observance of Women’s History Month prompts us to explore the lives and experiences of some of the many female trailblazers in our nation’s history. One such woman, Helen Eugenie Moore Anderson, known as Eugenie, accomplished not only one, but several “historic … Continue reading Eugenie Anderson’s Historic Firsts

Annie Oakley: A Woman to be Reckoned With

March is Women’s History Month! Today’s post comes from Madie Ward in the National Archives History Office. Among the billions of documents in the National Archives, Archivist of the United States David Ferriero has a favorite: the 1898 letter from Annie Oakley to President William McKinley offering 50 American lady sharpshooters in the Spanish-American War. … Continue reading Annie Oakley: A Woman to be Reckoned With