The Lost Gift Stones of the Washington Monument

February 19, 2018, is the Federal holiday celebrated as George Washington's Birthday. Today's post comes from John Lockwood, a long-time federal employee who has written numerous articles, many for the National Archives. Some time back, I was busy working on an article about how in 1854 Pope Pius IX donated a gift stone to be … Continue reading The Lost Gift Stones of the Washington Monument

Happy George Washington’s Birthday!

George Washington led the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War, presided over the Constitutional Convention, and served as the first President of the United States. He is known, quite rightfully, as the Father of our Country. Washington was born in Virginia on February 11, 1731, according to the then-used Julian calendar. In 1752 Britain and … Continue reading Happy George Washington’s Birthday!

Slavery at George Washington’s Mount Vernon

Today's post comes from Jim Zeender, Senior Registrar in the National Archives Exhibits Office. On October 1, 2016, the Mount Vernon Museum opened a new and groundbreaking exhibition called “Lives Bound Together: Slavery at George Washington’s Mount Vernon.” The exhibition explores the long and complex relationship between George Washington and his slaves and his evolving attitudes … Continue reading Slavery at George Washington’s Mount Vernon

Annual Message on the State of the Union: The President Speaks

Today’s post comes from Christine Blackerby, an Outreach Specialist at the Center for Legislative Archives at the National Archives in Washington, DC. On January 8, 1790, President George Washington delivered a speech at Federal Hall in New York City. This speech, called his first annual message to Congress (which we now refer to as the State … Continue reading Annual Message on the State of the Union: The President Speaks

The Senate irritates the President

This post continues our celebration of the 225th anniversary of the First Congress. The Constitution gives the President the “power, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, to make Treaties.” This first time the President attempted to seek that advice occurred in August 1789 when first President George Washington sent a message … Continue reading The Senate irritates the President

The Origins of Senatorial Courtesy

Today’s post comes from Christine Blackerby, an Outreach Specialist at the Center for Legislative Archives at the National Archives in Washington, DC. The Center for Legislative Archives is marking the 225th anniversary of the First Congress by sharing documents on Tumblr and Twitter; use #Congress225 to see all the postings. Two hundred and twenty-five years ago, on August 3, … Continue reading The Origins of Senatorial Courtesy

George Washington Writes in the Margins

Today's blog post comes from Susan K. Donius, Director of the Office of Presidential Libraries at the National Archives. This post originally appeared on the White House blog. Last month, President Obama began his second Inaugural Address by saying, “Each time we gather to inaugurate a President we bear witness to the enduring strength of … Continue reading George Washington Writes in the Margins

Constitution 225: George Washington’s Constitution

    Today's Constitution 225 post was written by Jim Zeender,  senior registrar in Exhibits at the National Archives. Imagine George Washington’s first day on the job as President of the United States on April 30, 1789. What what his role? How was he to act? What were his duties and powers? Who should advise … Continue reading Constitution 225: George Washington’s Constitution

Constitution 225: The President

  Today’s post was written by National Archives volunteer Paul Richter. It is part of a series tracing the development of the Constitution in honor of the 225th anniversary of this document on September 17, 2012. The President of the United States is one of the most famous positions in the world. But the first … Continue reading Constitution 225: The President

In their own words: John Adams and Ben Franklin, Part I

This is part of a series, written by Jim Zeender, devoted to letters written by the Founding Fathers in their own words and often in their own hand. Jim is a senior registrar in National Archives Exhibits. John Adams of Massachusetts and Benjamin Franklin of Pennsylvania crossed paths during “critical moments” in the earliest days … Continue reading In their own words: John Adams and Ben Franklin, Part I