Kansas City: Smoke Rings and the Finer Things

Today's post comes from Kimberlee Ried, public affairs specialist at the National Archives at Kansas City. In April, Google launched Kansas City: Smoke Rings and the Finer Things as the first U.S. city to be featured on the Google Arts & Culture website. Although the National Archives' relationship with Google is not new, the introduction of … Continue reading Kansas City: Smoke Rings and the Finer Things

What is Suffrage?

This year we mark the 100th anniversary of the woman suffrage amendment, and as it turns out, a lot of people don’t really know what “suffrage” means because it's mostly fallen out of common usage. The term has nothing to do with suffering but instead derives from the Latin word “suffragium,” meaning the right or … Continue reading What is Suffrage?

The Movement as a Mosaic: Alice Paul and Woman Suffrage

Our new exhibit “Rightfully Hers” opens in the Lawrence F. O’Brien Gallery in the National Archives Building on May 10, 2019. Today’s post comes from Michael J. Hancock in the National Archives History Office. I always feel the movement is a sort of mosaic. Each of us puts in one little stone, and then you get … Continue reading The Movement as a Mosaic: Alice Paul and Woman Suffrage

Words As Powerful As Bullets: Diplomats during the U.S. Civil War

Today’s blog post comes from Paige Weaver from the History Office of the National Archives. When most people think about the U.S. Civil War, they typically consider it a purely American affair that pitted the geographic regions of the North versus the South. Yet, this so-called “War Between the States” was hardly limited to the … Continue reading Words As Powerful As Bullets: Diplomats during the U.S. Civil War

Lights, Camera, Archives!

Today's post comes from Joseph Gillette, an archivist at the National Archives in College Park.   For many people, the National Archives’ media presence begins and ends with the movie National Treasure. But the Archives has been a centerpiece to many media productions in its history. This was certainly the case during the Golden Age of … Continue reading Lights, Camera, Archives!

Facial Hair Friday: Archivist of the United States Bert Rhoads

Fifth Archivist of the United States James Berton “Bert” Rhoads (Archivist: 1968–1979) had many distinctions. He was the youngest person to become Archivist; he started the National Archives annual Fourth of July celebrations; and he presided over the Archives during the largest influx of genealogy researchers during the Roots era. He also sported a nice mustache. … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: Archivist of the United States Bert Rhoads

Dr. Mary E. Walker

March is Women's History Month! Today's post comes from Holly Rivet, an archives technician at the National Archives at St. Louis. Few women became physicians in the 1850s; fewer still served in the Civil War; and only one was awarded the Medal of Honor. Dr. Mary E. Walker was born in 1832 in Oswego, New … Continue reading Dr. Mary E. Walker

Robert “Bob” Wolfe: Captured German Records Expert

For over 30 years Robert “Bob” Wolfe was the senior archivist for the captured German records at the National Archives seized during World War II. Now the Robert Wolfe Collection is available through the National Archives Library Information Center. After Wolfe passed away in 2014, his family donated his collection of works on World War … Continue reading Robert “Bob” Wolfe: Captured German Records Expert