Dr. Mary E. Walker

March is Women's History Month! Today's post comes from Holly Rivet, an archives technician at the National Archives at St. Louis. Few women became physicians in the 1850s; fewer still served in the Civil War; and only one was awarded the Medal of Honor. Dr. Mary E. Walker was born in 1832 in Oswego, New … Continue reading Dr. Mary E. Walker

Robert “Bob” Wolfe: Captured German Records Expert

For over 30 years Robert “Bob” Wolfe was the senior archivist for the captured German records at the National Archives seized during World War II. Now the Robert Wolfe Collection is available through the National Archives Library Information Center. After Wolfe passed away in 2014, his family donated his collection of works on World War … Continue reading Robert “Bob” Wolfe: Captured German Records Expert

Amelia Earhart: Showing What Women Can Do

March is Women’s History Month! Today’s post comes from Danielle Sklarew in the National Archives History Office. Like previous flights, I am undertaking this one solely because I want to, and because I feel that women now and then have to do things to show what women can do. Amelia Earhart sent these words to … Continue reading Amelia Earhart: Showing What Women Can Do

Josephine Cobb’s Discovery of a Lifetime

March is Women’s History Month! Visit National Archives News to see how we're celebrating. Today’s post comes from Michael Hancock in the National Archives History Office. According to the old saying, a picture is worth a thousand words. But in the case of Josephine Cobb and her 1952 discovery in a Civil War–era photograph, it’s worth … Continue reading Josephine Cobb’s Discovery of a Lifetime

Harriet Beecher Stowe: A Fighter for Social Justice

March is Women’s History Month and today is International Women's Day. To celebrate both events we are hosting an #ArchivesHerstory party! Today’s post comes from Michael J. Hancock in the National Archives History Office. Harriet Beecher Stowe was an abolitionist, author, and figure in the woman suffrage movement. Her magnum opus, Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852), was a … Continue reading Harriet Beecher Stowe: A Fighter for Social Justice

Facial Hair Friday: Percy Wyndham, Soldier Extraordinaire

Today’s post comes from Megan Huang, an intern in the National Archives History Office. Today's Facial Hair Friday is about a little-known Civil War Union officer, Col. Percy Wyndham, who has a perfectly pointed beard and mustache. An Englishman, Wyndham did not have the the usual path to participation in the American Civil War. Perhaps being … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: Percy Wyndham, Soldier Extraordinaire

Jackie Robinson’s 100th

We're wrapping up African American History Month. Visit the National Archives website for more information on our resources related to African American History. Today’s post comes from James Worsham, editor in the Communications and Marketing Division of the National Archives. Jackie Robinson, the first African American to play in modern major league baseball, would have been 100 … Continue reading Jackie Robinson’s 100th

The “Roots” of Genealogy at the National Archives

February is African American History Month. Visit the National Archives website for more information on our resources related to African American History. In 1964, writer and historian Alex Haley visited the National Archives to research his family history. Looking in the 1870 census records for Alamance County, NC, he was able to confirm some details he heard … Continue reading The “Roots” of Genealogy at the National Archives

Reaching Communities: National Archives Traveling Exhibits Service

Today’s post comes from Jennifer Johnson, curator in the National Archives Traveling Exhibits Service (NATES). On December 21, 2018, NATES program manager Dee Harris and I went to the Topeka and Shawnee County Public Library in Topeka, Kansas, where one of our traveling exhibits, “Over There” was on display in the Alice C. Sabatini Gallery. … Continue reading Reaching Communities: National Archives Traveling Exhibits Service

Facial Hair Friday: Joseph Rainey the first African American in the House

  Joseph Rainey was distinguished in many ways—he was the first African American to serve in the U.S. House of Representatives, the first African American to preside over the House of Representatives, and the longest–serving African American during Reconstruction. He also had pretty nice mutton chops. Rainey was born into slavery in 1832 in Georgetown, … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: Joseph Rainey the first African American in the House