Remembering Lloyd Oliver, U.S. Marine Navajo Code Talker

Today’s post comes from Cody White, an archivist at the National Archives at Denver. “One warm afternoon Lloyd was playing a fast moving game of basketball out on the campus. He loves basketball and is a very good player. At the completion of the game Lloyd came into Miss Jordan’s classroom, all hot and flushed … Continue reading Remembering Lloyd Oliver, U.S. Marine Navajo Code Talker

“It is history and it is fascinating”: Katherine Fite and the Nuremberg War Crime Trials, 1945

Today’s post comes from Tammy Williams, archivist and social media coordinator at the Harry S. Truman Presidential Library and Museum. In 1945, while Katherine Fite worked as an Assistant to the Legal Advisor in the State Department, her supervisor recommended her for a temporary assignment as an assistant to Justice Robert H. Jackson with the … Continue reading “It is history and it is fascinating”: Katherine Fite and the Nuremberg War Crime Trials, 1945

Using NARA’s Index to Naturalizations of World War I Soldiers

November 11 is Veterans Day. Visit the National Archives website for more resources on records related to Veterans. Today's post comes from Grace Schultz, an archivist at the National Archives at Philadelphia. Did your immigrant ancestor naturalize after serving in World War I? If so, you may have used NARA’s Index to Naturalizations of World … Continue reading Using NARA’s Index to Naturalizations of World War I Soldiers

Facial Hair Friday: Donehogawa (Ely S. Parker)

Today’s Facial Hair Friday is about Donehogawa, otherwise known as Ely S. Parker, the first Native American to be Commissioner of Indian Affairs.  Ely S. Parker was born a Seneca Indian in 1828 in Western New York on the then Tonawanda Reservation. Originally called Hasanoanda, he was baptized as Ely Samuel Parker. Educated in missionary schools, … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: Donehogawa (Ely S. Parker)

19th Amendment at 100: Women At The Polls

The 19th Amendment was ratified in 1920, but this landmark event was neither the beginning nor the end of the story for women and their struggle for the right to vote. Join us in 2020 as we commemorate this centennial year with 12 stories from our holdings for you to save, print, or share. November's featured … Continue reading 19th Amendment at 100: Women At The Polls

The National Archives and the Electoral College

When you vote in November, you won’t be casting your ballot directly for the Republican nominee or the Democratic nominee or any other candidate who wants to be President. Instead, you will be voting for the people who will actually “elect” the next President. They are called “electors,” and their names are often on the … Continue reading The National Archives and the Electoral College

Amending the Electoral College: The 12th Amendment

The Electoral College is outlined in Article II, Section 1, of the U.S. Constitution. It is the formal body that elects the President and Vice President of the United States. Back in 1787, when the delegates to the Constitutional Convention were trying to figure out how the President should be chosen, some wanted the Congress … Continue reading Amending the Electoral College: The 12th Amendment

The 1824 Presidential Election and the “Corrupt Bargain”

As we get ready to go to the polls on November 3, we're looking back one of the more controversial elections—the 1824 Presidential election. Today’s post comes from Michael J. Hancock, an archives technician at the National Archives at College Park, MD.  John Quincy Adams was elected President on February 9, 1825, when the House … Continue reading The 1824 Presidential Election and the “Corrupt Bargain”

Margaret Chase Smith: Breaking the Barrier

Today’s post comes from Dena Lombardo, an intern in the Office of Public and Media Communications. Seventy years ago, Senator Margaret Chase Smith (R-ME) delivered her “Declaration of Conscience” speech, criticizing Senator Joseph McCarthy and his anti-communist campaign.  Senator Margaret Chase Smith, ca. 1954 (Records of the U.S. Information Agency, National Archives) Her 15-minute speech … Continue reading Margaret Chase Smith: Breaking the Barrier

19th Amendment at 100: Ruth Bader Ginsburg

The 19th Amendment was ratified in 1920, but this landmark event was neither the beginning nor the end of the story for women and their struggle for the right to vote. Join us in 2020 as we commemorate this centennial year with 12 stories from our holdings for you to save, print, or share. October’s … Continue reading 19th Amendment at 100: Ruth Bader Ginsburg