Brush with Catastrophe: The Day the U.S. Almost Nuked Itself

Today’s post comes from Michael J. Hancock, an archives technician at the National Archives at College Park, MD. There was a time when the greatest threat during the Cold War was a nuclear strike by the Soviet Union. But for a moment during those tension-filled years, the United States almost nuked itself.  The U.S. narrowly … Continue reading Brush with Catastrophe: The Day the U.S. Almost Nuked Itself

A Promise to Faithfully Execute the Office: Presidential Inaugurations

January 20 is Inauguration Day. Visit the National Archives website for more information on Presidential elections and inaugurations.  At noon on January 20, 2021, President-elect Joe Biden will recite the oath of office in accordance with Article II, Section I of the U.S. Constitution: "I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully execute the … Continue reading A Promise to Faithfully Execute the Office: Presidential Inaugurations

Russian Wild Boars at Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Today’s post comes from Patrick Connelly, supervisory archivist at the National Archives at Philadelphia. The National Park Service (NPS) is well known for its robust efforts in the area of environmental and wildlife management. In 1959, the two clashed in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, forcing park officials to delicately weigh their solution. Great Smoky … Continue reading Russian Wild Boars at Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Facial Hair Friday: Paul Bunyan

In a city park overlooking Lake Bemidji in northern Minnesota sit two larger-than-life statues depicting fictional lumberjack Paul Bunyan and his reliable companion, Babe the Blue Ox. The roadside attraction, created in 1937, is still very popular with tourists to this day.  Statue of Paul Bunyan in Bemidji, Minnesota, 1947. (National Archives Identifier 2129751) The … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: Paul Bunyan

Top 10 of 2020

As we put 2020 into the past, we’re taking a look back on the most popular posts published this year. Thank you to the National Archives staff who helped us share our love of history.   10. The fourth installment of a series about unratified constitutional amendments, Unratified Amendments: Regulating Child Labor, explored an amendment proposed … Continue reading Top 10 of 2020

A Look Back at 2020

As 2020 comes to a close, we’re taking a look back at a year unlike any other.  The National Archives and Records Administration--with research rooms, museums, Federal Records Centers, and Presidential Libraries across the country--closed its doors in March and, for the most part, remained closed as part of our commitment to the health and … Continue reading A Look Back at 2020

The Bill of Rights: 14 Originals

December 15 is Bill of Rights Day, which commemorates the ratification of the first 10 amendments to the U.S. Constitution. For more information on events and resources at the National Archives, visit our Bill of Rights Day website. On September 25, 1789, the First Federal Congress passed the first proposed amendments to the U.S. Constitution. … Continue reading The Bill of Rights: 14 Originals

Winter at the White House

The White House is full of holiday traditions from parties and decorations to the lighting of the National Christmas Tree and Menorah. Today we’re looking back on winter holidays for each President in our Presidential Library system. The National Christmas Tree is illuminated on the Ellipse in Washington DC, 12/9/2010. (National Archives Identifier 176553384) Before … Continue reading Winter at the White House

Facial Hair Friday: Tom Selleck

It's Facial Hair Friday, and we’re taking a look at actor Tom Selleck and his iconic mustache. Today’s post comes from Michael J. Hancock, archives technician at the National Archives at College Park, MD. That red Ferrari, that Hawaiian shirt, that theme song, and that bushy mustache! Magnum P.I. was one of the most popular … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: Tom Selleck

The 19th Amendment at 100: Women and the Final Frontier

The 19th Amendment was ratified in 1920, but this landmark event was neither the beginning nor the end of the story for women and their struggle for the right to vote. Join us in 2020 as we commemorate this centennial year with 12 stories from our holdings for you to save, print, or share. December's featured … Continue reading The 19th Amendment at 100: Women and the Final Frontier