Facial Hair Friday: General Winfield Scott Hancock

Today is Facial Hair Friday, and we’re taking a look back at Union General Winfield Scott Hancock, whose statue sits across the street from the National Archives Building in Washington, DC. Today’s post comes from Michael J. Hancock in the National Archives History Office. When you think of the name Hancock, the image of an … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: General Winfield Scott Hancock

Designing a 21st-Century National Archives: International Archives Week 2019

Today's post comes from Meg Phillips, External Affairs Liaison at the National Archives. This week is International Archives Week, time set aside by the International Council on Archives (ICA) to celebrate the founding of ICA in 1948. It provides a single time when all archives around the world can call attention to the value of … Continue reading Designing a 21st-Century National Archives: International Archives Week 2019

An Unforgettable Day

Today’s post comes from Mitchell Yockelson, an Investigative Archivist with the Archival Recovery Program at the National Archives. This year marks the 75th anniversary of D-day.  Weighed down by hand grenades, a compass, entrenching tool, canteen, knife, rifle, pistol, ammunition belt, first aid kit, and two parachutes (main and reserve), Maj. Philip Gage jumped from … Continue reading An Unforgettable Day

The 19th Amendment at 100: Sharing the Story

This story is cross-posted on the websites of the Library of Congress, National Archives, and Smithsonian's American Women's History Initiative. On June 4, 1919, the U.S. Congress passed a federal woman suffrage amendment and sent it to the states for ratification. It was a thrilling moment for the movement to win the women's vote and the culmination of … Continue reading The 19th Amendment at 100: Sharing the Story

75th Anniversary of D-Day

This year marks 75 years since the invasion of Normandy on June 6, 1944, more commonly known as D-day. Today’s post comes from Megan Huang in the National Archives History Office.  On June 6, 1944, in one of the most well-remembered moments of World War II, American, British, and Canadian forces stormed the 50-mile stretch … Continue reading 75th Anniversary of D-Day

Kansas City: Smoke Rings and the Finer Things

Today's post comes from Kimberlee Ried, public affairs specialist at the National Archives at Kansas City. In April, Google launched Kansas City: Smoke Rings and the Finer Things as the first U.S. city to be featured on the Google Arts & Culture website. Although the National Archives' relationship with Google is not new, the introduction of … Continue reading Kansas City: Smoke Rings and the Finer Things

What is Suffrage?

This year we mark the 100th anniversary of the woman suffrage amendment, and as it turns out, a lot of people don’t really know what “suffrage” means because it's mostly fallen out of common usage. The term has nothing to do with suffering but instead derives from the Latin word “suffragium,” meaning the right or … Continue reading What is Suffrage?

The Movement as a Mosaic: Alice Paul and Woman Suffrage

Our new exhibit “Rightfully Hers” opens in the Lawrence F. O’Brien Gallery in the National Archives Building on May 10, 2019. Today’s post comes from Michael J. Hancock in the National Archives History Office. I always feel the movement is a sort of mosaic. Each of us puts in one little stone, and then you get … Continue reading The Movement as a Mosaic: Alice Paul and Woman Suffrage

Words As Powerful As Bullets: Diplomats during the U.S. Civil War

Today’s blog post comes from Paige Weaver from the History Office of the National Archives. When most people think about the U.S. Civil War, they typically consider it a purely American affair that pitted the geographic regions of the North versus the South. Yet, this so-called “War Between the States” was hardly limited to the … Continue reading Words As Powerful As Bullets: Diplomats during the U.S. Civil War