Constitution Day 1985 and Ross Perot’s Magna Carta

Before David M. Rubenstein owned the 1297 Magna Carta, it belonged to Texas billionaire H. Ross Perot, who for decades generously loaned it to the National Archives. On September 17, 1985—Constitution Day—Perot came to the National Archives to visit his Magna Carta, and address new U.S. citizens. Sadly in July 2019, Ross Perot passed away at … Continue reading Constitution Day 1985 and Ross Perot’s Magna Carta

John Hancock and His Signature

Today's post comes from Michael Hancock of the National Archives History Office. Declaration of Independence in the National Archives Rotunda for the Charters of Freedom. (Photo by Jeff Reed, National Archives) During my time working at the National Archives in Washington, DC, I often make it a point to visit the Rotunda at the end … Continue reading John Hancock and His Signature

Facial Hair Friday: Ansel Adams—Photographer of the American West

September 10, 2019, marks the 40th anniversary of Ansel Adams’s visit to the National Archives. Today's post comes from Vincent Bartholomew in the National Archives History Office. Ansel Adams visits the National Archives to look at some of his work, September 10, 1979. (Records of the National Archives) A keen landscape photographer, the always-bearded Adams … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: Ansel Adams—Photographer of the American West

Pneumatic Tube Transport

Pneumatic tubes were once a ubiquitous feature of Federal buildings both in Washington, DC, and around the country. Eleanor Ernest taking a cylinder with telegrams from the pneumatic tube in which they have been sent across several blocks by air pressure, Washington, DC, June 1943. (Photo courtesy of the Library of Congress) The National Archives … Continue reading Pneumatic Tube Transport

Positives and Negatives

This post documents the survey of photographic materials for transfer from Federal agencies to the newly created National Archives in the mid-1930s. Surveys were conducted while the National Archives Building in Washington, DC, was still being constructed. Today’s post comes from Joseph Gillette, a processing archivist at the National Archives at College Park, MD. Between … Continue reading Positives and Negatives

Rightfully Hers: Woman Suffrage Before the 19th Amendment

Today’s post comes from Vincent Bartholomew in the National Archives History Office. In celebration of the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, the National Archives exhibit Rightfully Hers: American Women and the Vote highlights activists’ relentless struggle to secure voting rights for all American women. While most Americans consider voting fundamental to the enjoyment of … Continue reading Rightfully Hers: Woman Suffrage Before the 19th Amendment

NARA Shout Out in Remote Places: Montara Light Station

Today's post comes from Larry Shockley, an archives specialist at the National Archives in College Park, MD. While traveling down California State Route 1 in Northern California a few years ago, I decided to stay a few days at HI Point Montara Lighthouse Hostel in Montara, California. Not only is this hostel centrally located on … Continue reading NARA Shout Out in Remote Places: Montara Light Station

Facial Hair Friday: John Muir

Today’s a twofer—it’s hashtag party #ArchivesOutdoors and Facial Hair Friday! Today’s post comes from Michael Steffen from the National Archives History Office. John Muir, ca. 1900. (Image Courtesy of the Library of Congress) Summer is a great opportunity for families to get together and spend time outdoors. From visiting a National Park to hiking on … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: John Muir

This Bud’s NOT for You

August 2 is International Beer Day! Today’s post comes from Patrick Connelly, an archivist at the National Archives at Philadelphia. When is a Bud not a Budweiser? When it’s a DuBois Budweiser of course! The iconic Budweiser brew has not been the sole domain of the Anheuser-Busch Brewing Company since it was first brewed in … Continue reading This Bud’s NOT for You

Happy 90th Birthday, Jacqueline Kennedy!

Jacqueline “Jackie” Bouvier Kennedy was born 90 years ago, on July 28, 1929. An icon of the 1960s, she remains one of the most popular First Ladies and is remembered for her contributions to the arts and her grace and style. Today's post comes from Megan Huang from the National Archives History Office.  Jacqueline Bouvier … Continue reading Happy 90th Birthday, Jacqueline Kennedy!