How the National Archives Became NARS

On June 19, 1934, the National Archives was created as an independent agency. But just 15 years later, on June 30, 1949, Congress passed legislation moving the National Archives to the newly created General Services Administration (GSA) and renamed it the National Archives and Records Service (NARS). Today we’re looking at the events that led … Continue reading How the National Archives Became NARS

Juneteenth: The First Commemoration of Abolition

June 19th, or “Juneteenth,” is the oldest known celebration commemorating the end of slavery in the United States. Today’s post, looking at the history of the federal holiday, comes from Saba Samy, an intern at the National Archives in Washington, DC. President Lincoln on the Battlefield, Maryland, Antietam, 1862. (National Archives Identifier 533297) On September … Continue reading Juneteenth: The First Commemoration of Abolition

#ArchivesPets on the National Archives Building

On Friday, June 7, 2024, the National Archives is raising the woof with our next #ArchivesHashtagParty—#ArchivesPets! Join us on social media to see some paw-some images and artifacts of pets in our collection and collections in repositories around the world.  Designed by renowned architect John Russell Pope, the National Archives Building is the most elaborately … Continue reading #ArchivesPets on the National Archives Building

Historic Staff Spotlight: Richard McCulley, Historian of the Records of Congress

We’re taking a look at past staff and their many contributions to the National Archives throughout history. Today’s staff spotlight is in memory of Richard McCulley, who served was Historian at the Center for Legislative Archives at the National Archives in Washington, DC.  (L-R) Carl Ashley, David McMillen, Marc Rothenberg, and Richard McCulley at the … Continue reading Historic Staff Spotlight: Richard McCulley, Historian of the Records of Congress

The Allegheny Arsenal Explosion and the Creation of Public Memory

Today’s post was developed from a former exhibit titled ”Allegheny Arsenal Explosion and the Creation of Public Memory.” The exhibit was initially displayed at the National Archives at Philadelphia and was then featured online as a digital exhibit. In collaboration with the National Archives Web Division, the National Archives at Philadelphia has reformatted the content … Continue reading The Allegheny Arsenal Explosion and the Creation of Public Memory

AAPI Exclusion and the Case of Wong Kim Ark

May is Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander (AANHPI) Heritage Month! Today’s post looking at the history of AANHPI immigration comes from Saba Samy, an intern at the National Archives in Washington, DC. Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander (AANHPI) history and immigration in the United States stretches as far back as the … Continue reading AAPI Exclusion and the Case of Wong Kim Ark

The Legacy of Brown v. Board of Education

70 years ago the Supreme Court issued its Brown v. the Board of Education ruling. Today’s post has been adapted from a piece by Daniel Holt, who served as the Director of the Dwight D. Eisenhower Presidential Library and Museum in Abilene from 1990 to 2008 and was a member of the Brown v. Board … Continue reading The Legacy of Brown v. Board of Education

Archives II turns 30

Thirty years ago on May 12, 1994, the National Archives at College Park, MD, popularly known as "Archives II," was dedicated. The 1.8-million-square-foot state-of-the-art facility, located just outside of Washington, DC, provides much-needed space for historically significant holdings of the National Archives.   The National Archives at College Park, MD. (NARA photo by Jeff Reed) When … Continue reading Archives II turns 30

#ArchivesGames: Bowling and the National Archives

On May 3, 2024, we’re having another #ArchivesHashtagParty with this month’s focus on #ArchivesGames. Today we’re rolling in with a post on bowling and the National Archives that we hope is right up your alley. So we don't cross the line, we promise to spare you of any more bowling puns! National Archives employee organizations … Continue reading #ArchivesGames: Bowling and the National Archives

Babe Ruth Day

April 27 is National Babe Ruth Day, when baseball fans worldwide celebrate baseball's all-time greatest player. It originated on April 27, 1947, when the new Commissioner of Baseball Albert "Happy" Chandler proclaimed it, and a major celebration of Ruth’s career was held at Yankee Stadium. Today’s post comes from Thomas Richardson, an expert archives technician … Continue reading Babe Ruth Day