Facial Hair Friday: Joseph Rainey the first African American in the House

  Joseph Rainey was distinguished in many ways—he was the first African American to serve in the U.S. House of Representatives, the first African American to preside over the House of Representatives, and the longest–serving African American during Reconstruction. He also had pretty nice mutton chops. Rainey was born into slavery in 1832 in Georgetown, … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: Joseph Rainey the first African American in the House

Shirley Chisholm: Unbought and Unbossed

This year marks the 50th anniversary of Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm’s swearing-in as the first African American woman in Congress. To commemorate the historic event, the National Archives is having a special document exhibit in the East Rotunda Gallery of the National Archives Building in Washington, DC, through April 3, 2019. Today’s post comes from Michael … Continue reading Shirley Chisholm: Unbought and Unbossed

Mr. and Mrs. Claus Were Not Communists

Today's post comes from Alan Walker, an archivist at the National Archives at College Park. Ha, you probably thought I was speaking of that jolly old elf and the missus. Nope. This story begins in 1936, soon after the publication of what would become a standard: Consumers Union Reports. It was the first publication devoted … Continue reading Mr. and Mrs. Claus Were Not Communists

President Johnson’s Impeachment Trial

Today’s post comes from Tom Eisinger, an archivist in the Center for Legislative Archives at the National Archives in Washington, DC. It is part two of a two-part series on the impeachment of President Andrew Johnson, which occurred 150 years ago.  On March 4, 1868, the House of Representatives formally presented 11 articles of impeachment to … Continue reading President Johnson’s Impeachment Trial

Andrew Johnson: Path to Impeachment

Today’s post comes from Tom Eisinger, an archivist in the Center for Legislative Archives at the National Archives in Washington, DC. It is part one of a two-part series on the impeachment of President Andrew Johnson. Politics were unsettled during the 1864 Presidential election. The incumbent, Abraham Lincoln, was opposed by the “Radical Republicans” in … Continue reading Andrew Johnson: Path to Impeachment

One Giant Leap: The Apollo Space Program at 50

Today’s post comes from Garet Anderson-Lind from the National Archives History Office. Fifty years ago, one of the greatest enterprises in human history began: the Apollo Space Program. Through the collective effort of a nation, it was going to put a man on the Moon. While many here in the United States are aware of … Continue reading One Giant Leap: The Apollo Space Program at 50

Wedding in Rural Querétaro

It’s National Hispanic Heritage Month! Visit our web page for resources on related records and how we are commemorating the month. Today’s post comes from Adam Berenbak, an archivist in the Center for Legislative Archives at the National Archives in Washington, DC.  A stone wall, tortillas, and a somber stare on the faces of those framed in … Continue reading Wedding in Rural Querétaro

Origins of National Hispanic Heritage Month

It’s National Hispanic Heritage Month! Visit our web page for resources on related records and how we are commemorating the month. Today's post comes from Kate Mollan, an archivist in the Center for Legislative Archives at the National Archives in Washington, DC.  It is in the tradition of our country to recognize, cherish and conserve the many … Continue reading Origins of National Hispanic Heritage Month

Hawaii’s long road to statehood

Today’s blog post comes from Lily Tyndall in the National Archives History Office. Hawaii’s journey to statehood was long and difficult. For centuries the islands of Hawaii were ruled by warring factions. In 1810, King Kamehameha unified all of the Hawaiian Islands into one royal kingdom. During the 19th Century, Western influence grew and by … Continue reading Hawaii’s long road to statehood

Putting the “Rat” in Ratification: Tennessee’s role in the 19th amendment

In 1878 Senator Aaron A. Sargent introduced into Congress a resolution proposing a constitutional amendment granting women the right to vote. On June 4, 1919,  after 40 years—and much effort and debate—Congress passed, by a two-thirds vote of both houses, that proposed amendment. It was then up to the states to ratify it.  Many states … Continue reading Putting the “Rat” in Ratification: Tennessee’s role in the 19th amendment