Bert Rhoads: Recordkeeper in Chief

The National Archives was created on June 19, 1934. During the month of June, the National Archives History Office is sharing stories about the former Archivists of the United States. James Berton "Bert" Rhoads joined the National Archives in 1952 as a microfilm operator, but soon headed down the professional track. In 1966 he was appointed Deputy … Continue reading Bert Rhoads: Recordkeeper in Chief

Fala and Barkers for Britain, 1941

Today's post commemorates National Dog Day, which celebrates dogs everywhere on August 26. Bow-wow! Calling all dog lovers—arguably history’s best known Presidential pet was Franklin Roosevelt’s Scottish terrier, Murray the Outlaw of Falahill (Fala for short), who was named after FDR’s famous Scottish ancestor, John Murray. He was given to Roosevelt in 1940 as a Christmas … Continue reading Fala and Barkers for Britain, 1941

Facial Hair Friday: Herman Haupt’s Success Proportional to the Size of His Beard

Today's blog post comes from Hannah Fenster, summer intern in the Public Affairs Office of the National Archives. Herman Haupt wasn’t hurting for hair. Or confidence. The scruff that framed his face and eyes contributed to his imposing persona—which was so stubborn that he often refused the help of other people so he could accomplish … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: Herman Haupt’s Success Proportional to the Size of His Beard

At Gettysburg: Brother v. Brother

Today's post comes from our summer intern Caroline Isleib. The Battle of Gettysburg raged 150 years ago today, and many lives were lost or forever changed by the Civil War. It was a war that ripped our country apart and, in quite a literal sense, pitted brother against brother. “This was never more true than … Continue reading At Gettysburg: Brother v. Brother

Thursday Photo Caption Contest

Choosing this week's winner was a difficult as balancing a hat on a burro, so we turned to Mary Ryan, who has seen many strange yet historic images from the holdings of the National Archives in her role the managing editor of Prologue magazine. Congratulations to Kim! Check your e-mail for a code for 15% off in the … Continue reading Thursday Photo Caption Contest

An Egg-centric White House Tradition

Today's an eggs-ellent day in Washington, DC, for young people! It's the annual White House Easter Egg Roll, where hundreds of children gather to roll eggs and play games on the South Lawn of the President's House. But the tradition did not start at the White House. It began on the lawns and terraces of the … Continue reading An Egg-centric White House Tradition

Romance in the Records

I was worried I would never find love at the National Archives. When Scribd.com approached my office about promoting Prologue magazine by creating a collection of romantic records for their Valentine's Day "Eat Say Love" event, I was very doubtful. Would I be able to find enough romance in the records to put together a … Continue reading Romance in the Records

Exploring the polar regions

As frigid temperatures cover much of the country, and many areas are still dealing with record amounts of snow, my thoughts turn to the polar explorers of the early 20th century. They didn't have Goretex jackets with superwarm linings, satellite communications, or portable computers. Our "Pieces of History" blog takes its name from a regular … Continue reading Exploring the polar regions

Mole in place at the Archives

Researching in original records often provides the researcher with surprises. Usually the surprise takes the form of an unknown letter, a reference to your topic in an unexpected place, or a lead that directs you to a new set of records to mine. Once in a great while, the surprise is something no one could … Continue reading Mole in place at the Archives

Lincoln to slaves: go somewhere else

Today's post comes from National Archives Office of Strategy and Communications staff writer Rob Crotty. The issue of slavery divided the country under Abraham  Lincoln's Presidency. The national argument was simple: either keep slavery or abolish it. But Abraham Lincoln, known as the Great Emancipator, may have also been known as the Great Colonizer when … Continue reading Lincoln to slaves: go somewhere else