Historic Staff Spotlight: Robert L. Clarke

We are taking a look at past staff and their many contributions to the National Archives throughout its history. Today’s staff spotlight is Robert L. Clarke, who served as the first official Black History Specialist at the National Archives.   Conference director Robert L. Clarke speaking at the National Archives Conference on Federal Archives as … Continue reading Historic Staff Spotlight: Robert L. Clarke

The Importance of Records: Japanese American Incarceration During World War II

The National Historic Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board is considering the National Archives Building in Washington, DC, to be a National Historic Landmark. The study includes the history of the building as well as ways records housed in the National Archives Building have been used throughout history. Today’s post looks at … Continue reading The Importance of Records: Japanese American Incarceration During World War II

Facial Hair Friday: George H. Pendleton

May 1–7, 2022, is Public Service Recognition Week, which honors the individuals who serve our nation as federal, state, county, and local government employees. Today’s Facial Hair Friday looks at the man who sponsored legislation establishing a merit-based system for hiring federal employees: Senator George Hunt Pendleton. George H. Pendleton. (National Archives Identifier 167250250) Although President George Washington … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: George H. Pendleton

Appointment of the First Archivist of the United States

Congress passed and President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed into law the National Archives Act on June 19, 1934. Not only did the legislation create the National Archives as an agency to oversee all federal recordkeeping, it established the position of Archivist of the United States. The Archivist, who was to make $10,000 annually, was to … Continue reading Appointment of the First Archivist of the United States

Historic Staff Spotlight: Marion Tinling

We are taking a look at past staff and their many contributions to the National Archives throughout history. Today’s staff spotlight is on Marion Tinling, an expert on shorthand, who worked for the National Historical Publications Commission in the 1950s and early 1960s. Marion Tinling (née Goble) was born on December 17, 1904, in Queens, … Continue reading Historic Staff Spotlight: Marion Tinling

Mystery of the Arctic Ice: Who was First to the North Pole

Today’s post comes from Lori Norris, an archives technician at the National Archives at College Park. The Polar Expeditions records, which this post is based on, includes papers, journals, and artifacts from Arctic and Antarctic expeditions. Held at the National Archives at College Park, these records were donated mostly from the explorers or their families. … Continue reading Mystery of the Arctic Ice: Who was First to the North Pole

The 1790 Census and the First Veto

On April 1, 2022, the National Archives released the 1950 Census. For more information and to view the census, visit the National Archives website. The U.S. Constitution requires that an enumeration be taken every 10 years to determine the size of the House of Representatives. The Constitution originally designated 65 members in the House but … Continue reading The 1790 Census and the First Veto

Facial Hair Friday: Edward Miner Gallaudet

Today’s Facial Hair Friday looks at the first president of what would become Gallaudet University in Washington DC: Edward Miner Gallaudet. It features photographs from the Mathew Brady collection at the National Archives. Edward Miner Gallaudet was born on February 5, 1837, in Hartford, Connecticut. He was the youngest of eight children. His father, Reverend … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: Edward Miner Gallaudet

Historic Staff Spotlight: Helen Beach

We are taking a look at past staff and their many contributions to the National Archives throughout history. Today’s staff spotlight is on Helen Beach, who worked for the National Archives from 1936 to her retirement in 1965 and developed her own cart, known as the "Beach Wagon."  Frances Helen Beach was born on July … Continue reading Historic Staff Spotlight: Helen Beach

Public Access to Census Records at the National Archives

On April 1, 2022, the National Archives will release the 1950 Census. For more information on the records release, visit the National Archives website. Article I of the U.S. Constitution provides that an enumeration be taken every 10 years, with the first federal population census taken in 1790. While the original intent of the census … Continue reading Public Access to Census Records at the National Archives