New Online Exhibit: The “Old Navy” Prints and Watercolors

Today’s post comes from Megan Huang from the National Archives History Office. Besides his role as President during two of the greatest crises in American history, Franklin D. Roosevelt is also famous for having been a collector. Well-known as a collector of stamps, Roosevelt also carefully accumulated a vast amount of paraphernalia relating to the … Continue reading New Online Exhibit: The “Old Navy” Prints and Watercolors

FDR’s White House Map Room

October is American Archives Month! We’re celebrating the work of archivists and the importance of archives with a series of blog posts highlighting our “Archives Across America.” Today’s post comes from Sarah Navins from the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library in Hyde Park, New York.  Franklin D. Roosevelt's mind saw in maps. His love of maps can … Continue reading FDR’s White House Map Room

Happy Mother’s Day!

Every year I struggle with how I can show appreciation for my mom on Mother’s Day. This year I'm going retro and “making” my mom a gift by highlighting some of the National Archives holdings that relate to Mother’s Day. Although it was celebrated in several states for years, the first time Mother’s Day became … Continue reading Happy Mother’s Day!

A precedent-breaking inauguration

On January 20, 1941, President Franklin D. Roosevelt made history by being the first President to be inaugurated for a third term. The previous year, Roosevelt had been elected President for the third time, and the inauguration marked the start of his third term in office. No other President in American history had been elected … Continue reading A precedent-breaking inauguration

Bill of Rights Day

December 15 is Bill of Rights Day which commemorates the ratification of the first ten amendments to the U.S. Constitution.  As we celebrate the 225th anniversary of the Bill of Rights on December 15—Bill of Rights Day—let’s take a look back at the origins and history of that day. On December 15, 1791, the first 10 amendments … Continue reading Bill of Rights Day

New Web Exhibit on FDR and the Presidential Library System

Today’s post comes from Andrew Grafton in the National Archives History Office. A man deeply devoted to preserving United States history, President Franklin D. Roosevelt made contributions to the National Archives that have proven invaluable. Not only did he sign the law creating the National Archives, appoint the first Archivist of the United States, and … Continue reading New Web Exhibit on FDR and the Presidential Library System

Fidel Castro’s childhood plea to President Roosevelt

Continuing our celebration of Natinal Hispanic Heritage Month, this post comes from Idaliz Marie Ortiz Morales, intern in the National Archives Office of Strategy and Communications. Did you know that Fidel Castro, when he was just 14 years old, wrote a letter to President Franklin D. Roosevelt during World War II? How many of us, at … Continue reading Fidel Castro’s childhood plea to President Roosevelt

Rudy Martinez: The Beginning of the Latino Impact in World War II

Continuing our celebration of National Hispanic Heritage Month, today’s post comes from Idaliz Marie Ortiz Morales, intern in the Office of Strategy and Communications at the National Archives. To find out more about our Bilingual Social Media Project. In English: On December 7, 1941, the date that President Franklin D. Roosevelt said would “live in infamy,” … Continue reading Rudy Martinez: The Beginning of the Latino Impact in World War II

State Dinners at the White House

Today's post comes from the National Archives Office of Presidential Libraries. King David Kalakaua of Hawaii was the first head of state to be honored with a White House state dinner on December 12, 1874, by President and Mrs. Ulysses S. Grant. In the years that have followed, state dinners have come to signify the utmost respect … Continue reading State Dinners at the White House

Amending the Constitution: 100 Days to 200 Years

The Constitution hasn’t changed much since it was adopted in 1787. However, it has been tweaked by 27 amendments—some were ratified in a few months, another took more than two centuries. The ink on the Constitution had barely dried in 1787 when people discovered what it did not say. It did not spell out adequately, … Continue reading Amending the Constitution: 100 Days to 200 Years