Evidence Exposed a Crumbling Klan: KKK v. John F. Strayer et. al.

Today’s post comes from Grace DiAgostino, an archives technician in Research Services at the National Archives at Philadelphia. The Knights of the Ku Klux Klan (KKK) is one of the most infamous hate groups in American history. Founded in the aftermath of the Civil War as a social club, the KKK throughout the 19th and … Continue reading Evidence Exposed a Crumbling Klan: KKK v. John F. Strayer et. al.

The Return of Captured Records from World War II

Today’s post comes from Sonia Kahn in the National Archives History Office. It is part three of a series on the history of some of the seized foreign records housed at the National Archives. Following World War II, German documents captured during the war were kept in the custody of the United States and Great … Continue reading The Return of Captured Records from World War II

The Seizure of European Records during World War II

Today’s post comes from Sonia Kahn in the National Archives History Office. It is part two of a series on the history behind some of the seized foreign records housed at the National Archives. The story of what would become the original documents to compose Record Group 242, Foreign Records Seized, begins in 1943 as … Continue reading The Seizure of European Records during World War II

The Gems of Record Group 242 – Foreign Records Seized

Today’s post comes from Sonia Kahn in the National Archives History Office. It is part one of a series on the history behind some of the seized foreign records housed at the National Archives. When you think of the holdings at the National Archives, it’s likely that three prominent documents immediately come to mind. After … Continue reading The Gems of Record Group 242 – Foreign Records Seized

Making it Official: The Day the Declaration of Independence was Signed

Today’s post comes from Andrew Grafton in the National Archives History Office. Independence Day in the United States is celebrated on July 4, the day the Second Continental Congress ratified the Declaration of Independence. If you ask just about any American, they can correctly identify that date. What is less commonly known, however, is that … Continue reading Making it Official: The Day the Declaration of Independence was Signed

The 1986 Immigration Act and My Lifetime Relationship with the Lincoln Cottage

Today's post comes from Jim Zeender, Registrar on the National Archives Exhibits Staff.  On June 1, my colleagues Alexis Hill, Warren Halsey, and I culminated about nine months of work with a visit to the Lincoln Cottage on the grounds of the Old Soldiers Home. Terry Boone and Bill Nenichka had participated in previous trips. A … Continue reading The 1986 Immigration Act and My Lifetime Relationship with the Lincoln Cottage