Carlisle Indian School’s World War I Soldiers

November is Native American Heritage Month. Visit National Archives News for more information on related resources. Today’s post comes from Rachel Bartgis, conservator technician at the National Archives at College Park, MD. Founded in 1879, the United States Indian Industrial School in Carlisle, Pennsylvania (generally called the Carlisle Indian School) was a federally funded boarding … Continue reading Carlisle Indian School’s World War I Soldiers

Gold Star Mothers of World War I

Memorial Day honors those who died while serving in the U.S. military. Visit the National Archives website for more information and related resources on Memorial Day. Today’s post comes from Rachel Bartgis, conservator technician at the National Archives at College Park, MD. After the end of World War I, the U.S. Government sent out over … Continue reading Gold Star Mothers of World War I

Men of Mordechai: Jewish Americans in the U.S. Armed Forces

Today’s post comes from Thomas Richardson, an archives technician at the National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis, Missouri. The U.S. Armed Forces draws recruits from all races, cultures, faiths, and socioeconomic status. Since the nation’s founding, Jewish immigrants and families have had a long tradition of military service in every American conflict since the … Continue reading Men of Mordechai: Jewish Americans in the U.S. Armed Forces

100th Anniversary of the Return of the Wheaton

Memorial Day honors those who died while serving in the U.S. military. Visit the National Archives website for more information and related resources. Today’s post comes from Rachel Bartgis, conservator technician at the National Archives at College Park, MD. Many of the families of the Americans killed overseas in World War I between 1914 and … Continue reading 100th Anniversary of the Return of the Wheaton

Honoring Heroes: The Award Card Record Series

Today’s post comes from Thomas Richardson, an archives technician at the National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis, Missouri. It is the part of a series on records at the National Personnel Records Center. In 1973, when an infamous fire ripped through the National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis, Missouri, thousands of records were … Continue reading Honoring Heroes: The Award Card Record Series

Using NARA’s Index to Naturalizations of World War I Soldiers

November 11 is Veterans Day. Visit the National Archives website for more resources on records related to Veterans. Today's post comes from Grace Schultz, an archivist at the National Archives at Philadelphia. Did your immigrant ancestor naturalize after serving in World War I? If so, you may have used NARA’s Index to Naturalizations of World … Continue reading Using NARA’s Index to Naturalizations of World War I Soldiers

The 1932 Bonus Army: Black and White Americans Unite in March on Washington

Today's post comes from Alice Kamps, a curator at the National Archives in Washington, DC. It would not be Gen. Douglas MacArthur’s last act of insubordination. Decades later, his recalcitrance cost him his career. But this time there would be no discernible consequences, at least not for him. Against direct orders from the President, MacArthur … Continue reading The 1932 Bonus Army: Black and White Americans Unite in March on Washington

Wear a Mask and Save Your Life: The 1918 Flu Pandemic

This post, by Megan Huang in the National Archives History Office, was originally published in 2018 marking the centenary of the 1918 influenza. It has been updated with additional images. Masks as protection against influenza. Street cleaner wearing the influenza mask, 10/16/1918. (National Archives Identifier 45499357) The 1918 influenza pandemic was a pandemic in the … Continue reading Wear a Mask and Save Your Life: The 1918 Flu Pandemic

Anna Coleman Ladd: An Artist Who Created Hope for Wounded Soldiers

In celebration of Women Inventors Month and Women's History Month, the National Archives commemorates the extraordinary women who have made great contributions throughout American history. Today's post comes from Dena Lombardo, an intern in the Office of Public and Media Communications. In 1917, American sculptor Anna Coleman Ladd moved from the United States to France … Continue reading Anna Coleman Ladd: An Artist Who Created Hope for Wounded Soldiers

From Armistice to Veterans Day

November 11 is Veterans Day. Visit the National Archives website to learn more about our resources and events related to the holiday. Today’s post comes from Paige Weaver, an intern in the National Archives History Office. On the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month in the year 1918, World War I … Continue reading From Armistice to Veterans Day