The 1932 Bonus Army: Black and White Americans Unite in March on Washington

Today's post comes from Alice Kamps, a curator at the National Archives in Washington, DC. It would not be Gen. Douglas MacArthur’s last act of insubordination. Decades later, his recalcitrance cost him his career. But this time there would be no discernible consequences, at least not for him. Against direct orders from the President, MacArthur … Continue reading The 1932 Bonus Army: Black and White Americans Unite in March on Washington

Wear a Mask and Save Your Life: the 1918 Flu Pandemic

This post, by Megan Huang in the National Archives History Office, was originally published in 2018 marking the centenary of the 1918 influenza. It has been updated with additional images. Masks as protection against influenza. Street cleaner wearing the influenza mask, 10/16/1918. (National Archives Identifier 45499357) The 1918 influenza pandemic was a pandemic in the … Continue reading Wear a Mask and Save Your Life: the 1918 Flu Pandemic

Anna Coleman Ladd: An Artist Who Created Hope for Wounded Soldiers

In celebration of Women Inventors Month and Women's History Month, the National Archives commemorates the extraordinary women who have made great contributions throughout American history. Today's post comes from Dena Lombardo, an intern in the Office of Public and Media Communications. In 1917, American sculptor Anna Coleman Ladd moved from the United States to France … Continue reading Anna Coleman Ladd: An Artist Who Created Hope for Wounded Soldiers

From Armistice to Veterans Day

November 11 is Veterans Day. Visit the National Archives website to learn more about our resources and events related to the holiday. Today’s post comes from Paige Weaver, an intern in the National Archives History Office. On the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month in the year 1918, World War I … Continue reading From Armistice to Veterans Day

The 1918 Boston Red Sox and World War I

Today’s post comes from Daniel J. Fleming, an archives technician at the National Archives at Boston. The successful postseason run of the 2018 World Series champion Boston Red Sox provides a timely opportunity to revisit the franchise's championship team from 100 years ago. As America entered World War I and many of Boston’s ballplayers joined … Continue reading The 1918 Boston Red Sox and World War I

“It is Now or Never”: Final Victory in the Great War

This month marks the 100th anniversary of the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. To commemorate the historic battle, the National Archives is having a special document exhibit in the East Rotunda Gallery of the National Archives Building in Washington, DC, from September 21 through October 31, 2018. Today’s post comes from Mike Hancock in the National Archives History … Continue reading “It is Now or Never”: Final Victory in the Great War

Unsung heroes of World War I: the carrier pigeons

Today’s post comes from Garet Anderson-Lind from the National Archives History Office. World War I was one of the first great wars during the industrial revolution. From the introduction of airplanes to the use of tanks and railway guns on the battlefield, soldiers had to contend not only with each other but with the productions … Continue reading Unsung heroes of World War I: the carrier pigeons

The First to Fight: The 11th Engineers in the Battle of Cambrai

Today’s post comes from Austin McManus with the National Archives History Office. The United States, following the tradition of neutrality established by President George Washington and maintained over the decades, remained uninvolved as Europe became embroiled in World War I in 1914. American public attitude toward neutrality began to change after Germany’s policy of unrestricted … Continue reading The First to Fight: The 11th Engineers in the Battle of Cambrai

Vietnam and the Women Who Served

In honor of Veterans Day, today’s post comes from Bailey Martin, an intern in the National Archives History Office. Visit our website for more information on our resources related to veterans. As we open the new Vietnam exhibit at the National Archives, we also mark the anniversary of important milestones for women in the U.S. … Continue reading Vietnam and the Women Who Served

Beyond the Hindenburg: Airships Throughout History

October is American Archives Month! We’re celebrating the work of archivists and the importance of archives with a series of blog posts highlighting our “Archives Across America.” Today’s post comes from Alex Champion, archivist at the National Archives in College Park, MD. The dramatic, fiery fate of the German rigid airship LZ-129, the Hindenburg, in … Continue reading Beyond the Hindenburg: Airships Throughout History