The Significance of Hispanic Heritage Month | El Significado del Mes de la Herencia Hispana

Today’s post comes from Anayeli Nuñez at the National Archives History Office, and is available in both English and Spanish Hispanic Heritage Month a month-long celebration from September 15 to October 15 dedicated to recognizing the contributions of the Hispanic and Latino populations in the country, is significant in many different ways. The first, and sometimes … Continue reading The Significance of Hispanic Heritage Month | El Significado del Mes de la Herencia Hispana

The “Legal and Administrative Difficulties” of the Watergate Files

Today’s post traces the legal and administrative challenges the National Archives faced when presented with the transfer of the papers of the Watergate Special Prosecution Force. It's from Joseph Gillette, an archivist on cross-training with the National Archives History Office.  Four and a half years after the Watergate break-in—and years of investigation, scandal, legal activity, … Continue reading The “Legal and Administrative Difficulties” of the Watergate Files

A Very Presidential Father’s Day

In honor of Father’s Day, we are taking a look at some of the most well-known fathers in our country’s history: the Presidents of the United States! Today’s post comes from Danielle Sklarew, an intern in the National Archives History Office. Gerald Ford playing with son Michael President Gerald Ford had four children. Here he … Continue reading A Very Presidential Father’s Day

Do you have World Cup fever?!

Today’s post celebrates the international sporting event that captivates billions of people every four years: the FIFA World Cup! Every four years we get to experience the biggest sporting event on the planet and watch the very best of the beautiful game. Sadly, the U.S. national team did not qualify for the 2018 World Cup … Continue reading Do you have World Cup fever?!

President Johnson’s Impeachment Trial

Today’s post comes from Tom Eisinger, an archivist in the Center for Legislative Archives at the National Archives in Washington, DC. It is part two of a two-part series on the impeachment of President Andrew Johnson, which occurred 150 years ago.  On March 4, 1868, the House of Representatives formally presented 11 articles of impeachment to … Continue reading President Johnson’s Impeachment Trial

13 Times the Presidents Were Just Like Us

May is National Photo Month, and to celebrate, we’re sharing photos from the National Archives showing that Presidents are people too! Today’s listicle comes from Anayeli Nuñez from the National Archives History Office. 1. When Clinton stepped out for a jog in this 90s monochromatic outfit. Iconic.   2. When Nixon tried getting as close as … Continue reading 13 Times the Presidents Were Just Like Us

The Jefferson Memorial Turns 75

On Friday, April 13, 2018, the memorial dedicated to Thomas Jefferson—our third President and principal author of the Declaration of Independence—turns 75.   The memorial’s architect, John Russell Pope (1874–1937), was also architect of the National Archives Building. While Pope lived long enough to see the opening of the Archives, he died before groundbreaking for the … Continue reading The Jefferson Memorial Turns 75

Andrew Johnson: Path to Impeachment

Today’s post comes from Tom Eisinger, an archivist in the Center for Legislative Archives at the National Archives in Washington, DC. It is part one of a two-part series on the impeachment of President Andrew Johnson. Politics were unsettled during the 1864 Presidential election. The incumbent, Abraham Lincoln, was opposed by the “Radical Republicans” in … Continue reading Andrew Johnson: Path to Impeachment

The Lost Gift Stones of the Washington Monument

February 19, 2018, is the Federal holiday celebrated as George Washington's Birthday. Today's post comes from John Lockwood, a long-time federal employee who has written numerous articles, many for the National Archives. Some time back, I was busy working on an article about how in 1854 Pope Pius IX donated a gift stone to be … Continue reading The Lost Gift Stones of the Washington Monument

A Call to Public Service: the Peace Corps

This May we celebrate both Public Service Recognition Week and the centennial of the birth of a President closely associated with public service: John F. Kennedy.    In Kennedy’s first inaugural address, in 1961, he made his famous call to public service by asking Americans “to ask not what your country can do for you—ask what … Continue reading A Call to Public Service: the Peace Corps