The National Archives and the Electoral College

When you vote in November, you won’t be casting your ballot directly for the Republican nominee or the Democratic nominee or any other candidate who wants to be President. Instead, you will be voting for the people who will actually “elect” the next President. They are called “electors,” and their names are often on the … Continue reading The National Archives and the Electoral College

Amending the Electoral College: The 12th Amendment

The Electoral College is outlined in Article II, Section 1, of the U.S. Constitution. It is the formal body that elects the President and Vice President of the United States. Back in 1787, when the delegates to the Constitutional Convention were trying to figure out how the President should be chosen, some wanted the Congress … Continue reading Amending the Electoral College: The 12th Amendment

The 1824 Presidential Election and the “Corrupt Bargain”

As we get ready to go to the polls on November 3, we're looking back one of the more controversial elections—the 1824 Presidential election. Today’s post comes from Michael J. Hancock, an archives technician at the National Archives at College Park, MD.  John Quincy Adams was elected President on February 9, 1825, when the House … Continue reading The 1824 Presidential Election and the “Corrupt Bargain”

The 1932 Bonus Army: Black and White Americans Unite in March on Washington

Today's post comes from Alice Kamps, a curator at the National Archives in Washington, DC. It would not be Gen. Douglas MacArthur’s last act of insubordination. Decades later, his recalcitrance cost him his career. But this time there would be no discernible consequences, at least not for him. Against direct orders from the President, MacArthur … Continue reading The 1932 Bonus Army: Black and White Americans Unite in March on Washington

“I never wanted to do anything as badly in my life:” Bess Truman Bobs Her Hair

Today's post comes from Tammy Williams, Archivist and Social Media Coordinator at the Harry S. Truman Presidential Library and Museum. These days, everyone seems to be struggling with their hair. Hair salon closures due to the coronavirus pandemic have men with shaggy hair, or just shaving it all off, and women contemplating at-home trims. But … Continue reading “I never wanted to do anything as badly in my life:” Bess Truman Bobs Her Hair

The Death of a President

April 12 marks the 75th anniversary of the death of President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Today’s post comes from Michael J. Hancock, archives technician at the National Archives at College Park, MD. “We have always held to the hope, the belief, the conviction, that there is a better life, a better world, beyond the horizon.” —Franklin … Continue reading The Death of a President

Facial Hair Friday: the First President Not Clean-shaven

Every February we celebrate Presidents Day (the Federal holiday is really George Washington’s Birthday, but I’ll never win that battle). So, today’s Facial Hair Friday is all about the first President with facial hair: John Quincy Adams.  John Quincy Adams, undated. (National Archives Identifier 528668) John Quincy Adams was the sixth President of the United … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: the First President Not Clean-shaven

Facial Hair Friday: Santa Claus

Today’s post comes from Paige Weaver in the National Archives History Office. It’s the holiday season, and you are likely to see jolly old fat men with big fluffy white beards dressed in red suits. This iconic image of Santa Claus, a man who flies around the world in his sleigh pulled by magic reindeer … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: Santa Claus

From the Battlefield to the Oval Office: Presidents Who Were Veterans

Today’s blog post comes from Paige Weaver in the National Archives History Office. From George Washington to the present day, 44 different men have been elected President of the United States. The men who compose this exclusive list are diverse and unique in many ways, but 26 of them shared a significant common experience: service … Continue reading From the Battlefield to the Oval Office: Presidents Who Were Veterans

The Significance of Hispanic Heritage Month | El Significado del Mes de la Herencia Hispana

Today’s post comes from Anayeli Nuñez at the National Archives History Office, and is available in both English and Spanish Hispanic Heritage Month a month-long celebration from September 15 to October 15 dedicated to recognizing the contributions of the Hispanic and Latino populations in the country, is significant in many different ways. The first, and sometimes … Continue reading The Significance of Hispanic Heritage Month | El Significado del Mes de la Herencia Hispana