Robert “Bob” Wolfe: Captured German Records Expert

For over 30 years Robert “Bob” Wolfe was the senior archivist for the captured German records at the National Archives seized during World War II. Now the Robert Wolfe Collection is available through the National Archives Library Information Center. After Wolfe passed away in 2014, his family donated his collection of works on World War … Continue reading Robert “Bob” Wolfe: Captured German Records Expert

Remembering Pearl Harbor: the Ni’ihau Incident

This month marks the anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor. Visit the National Archives News website to learn more about resources related to that infamous event. Today’s post comes from Michael J. Hancock in the National Archives History Office. When the Empire of Japan launched its attack on Pearl Harbor the morning of December … Continue reading Remembering Pearl Harbor: the Ni’ihau Incident

From Armistice to Veterans Day

November 11 is Veterans Day. Visit the National Archives website to learn more about our resources and events related to holiday, and visit our exhibit, “Remembering Vietnam,” which runs in the Lawrence F. O’Brien Gallery at the National Archives Building until January 6, 2019. Today’s post comes from Paige Weaver, an intern in the National Archives … Continue reading From Armistice to Veterans Day

National Archives Remembers “Monuments Man” Harry Ettlinger

Today's post comes from Miriam Kleiman, Program Director for Public Affairs at the National Archives.  We are saddened to learn of the death of Monuments Man Harry Ettlinger at age 92. Ettlinger spoke at a National Archives ceremony on May 8, 2014 (marking the anniversary of V-E Day), when he and Robert Edsel, head of the Monuments … Continue reading National Archives Remembers “Monuments Man” Harry Ettlinger

“You Can’t Dig Coal With Bayonets”

Today’s post comes from Michael Hancock, a research and writing intern at the National Archives at Philadelphia. Part of the legacy of World War II is rallying cries and imagery associated with “loose lips sink ships” and “we can do it.” On the home front, coal miners coined their own slogan when the government threatened … Continue reading “You Can’t Dig Coal With Bayonets”

Morgantown Ordnance Works Panoramas, 1940-1942

Today’s post comes from Nicholas Novine, a processing intern at the National Archives at Philadelphia. We are pleased to announce that a series of 91 panoramas documenting industrial developments of the Morgantown Ordnance Works at Morgantown, West Virginia have been digitized and are available through our online catalog. Staff at the National Archives at Philadelphia … Continue reading Morgantown Ordnance Works Panoramas, 1940-1942

A Gift from an Archivist

Today's post comes from Corinne Porter, a curator from the National Archives Exhibits Program in Washington, DC. The Featured Document exhibit is the place in the National Archives Museum where we share—a document or two at a time—some of the most incredible records that belong to the American people. Featured Document exhibits often commemorate landmark … Continue reading A Gift from an Archivist

Vietnam and the Women Who Served

In honor of Veterans Day, today’s post comes from Bailey Martin, an intern in the National Archives History Office. Visit our website for more information on our resources related to veterans. As we open the new Vietnam exhibit at the National Archives, we also mark the anniversary of important milestones for women in the U.S. … Continue reading Vietnam and the Women Who Served

Beyond the Hindenburg: Airships Throughout History

October is American Archives Month! We’re celebrating the work of archivists and the importance of archives with a series of blog posts highlighting our “Archives Across America.” Today’s post comes from Alex Champion, archivist at the National Archives in College Park, MD. The dramatic, fiery fate of the German rigid airship LZ-129, the Hindenburg, in … Continue reading Beyond the Hindenburg: Airships Throughout History

FDR’s White House Map Room

October is American Archives Month! We’re celebrating the work of archivists and the importance of archives with a series of blog posts highlighting our “Archives Across America.” Today’s post comes from Sarah Navins from the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library in Hyde Park, New York.  Franklin D. Roosevelt's mind saw in maps. His love of maps can … Continue reading FDR’s White House Map Room