Searching for Stragglers: The Guam Combat Patrol

May is Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month. Today’s post comes from Thomas Richardson, an archives technician at the National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis, Missouri. The Pacific Theater arguably contained the bloodiest fighting of World War II. Combined U.S. Navy, Army, Army Air Force, and Marine forces trudged from island to island in the … Continue reading Searching for Stragglers: The Guam Combat Patrol

Men of Mordechai: Jewish Americans in the U.S. Armed Forces

Today’s post comes from Thomas Richardson, an archives technician at the National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis, Missouri. The U.S. Armed Forces draws recruits from all races, cultures, faiths, and socioeconomic status. Since the nation’s founding, Jewish immigrants and families have had a long tradition of military service in every American conflict since the … Continue reading Men of Mordechai: Jewish Americans in the U.S. Armed Forces

Honoring Heroes: The Award Card Record Series

Today’s post comes from Thomas Richardson, an archives technician at the National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis, Missouri. It is the part of a series on records at the National Personnel Records Center. In 1973, when an infamous fire ripped through the National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis, Missouri, thousands of records were … Continue reading Honoring Heroes: The Award Card Record Series

Victory at Home and Abroad: Combating Segregation in the Armed Forces

February is Black History Month. Visit our website for information on related resources and virtual events. Today’s post comes from Thomas Richardson, an archives technician at the National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis, MO. The valiant effort of those who fought and sacrificed themselves in the line of duty during World War II is … Continue reading Victory at Home and Abroad: Combating Segregation in the Armed Forces

Top 10 of 2020

As we put 2020 into the past, we’re taking a look back on the most popular posts published this year. Thank you to the National Archives staff who helped us share our love of history.   10. The fourth installment of a series about unratified constitutional amendments, Unratified Amendments: Regulating Child Labor, explored an amendment proposed … Continue reading Top 10 of 2020

Remembering Lloyd Oliver, U.S. Marine Navajo Code Talker

Today’s post comes from Cody White, an archivist at the National Archives at Denver. “One warm afternoon Lloyd was playing a fast moving game of basketball out on the campus. He loves basketball and is a very good player. At the completion of the game Lloyd came into Miss Jordan’s classroom, all hot and flushed … Continue reading Remembering Lloyd Oliver, U.S. Marine Navajo Code Talker

“It is history and it is fascinating”: Katherine Fite and the Nuremberg War Crime Trials, 1945

Today’s post comes from Tammy Williams, archivist and social media coordinator at the Harry S. Truman Presidential Library and Museum. In 1945, while Katherine Fite worked as an Assistant to the Legal Advisor in the State Department, her supervisor recommended her for a temporary assignment as an assistant to Justice Robert H. Jackson with the … Continue reading “It is history and it is fascinating”: Katherine Fite and the Nuremberg War Crime Trials, 1945

Little Boy: The First Atomic Bomb

August 6, 2020, marks the 75th anniversary of the dropping of the first atomic bomb. Today’s post comes from Michael J. Hancock, an archives technician at the National Archives at College Park, MD.  Two American atomic bombs ended World War II in August 1945, and the devastation will be forever remembered. In an instant when … Continue reading Little Boy: The First Atomic Bomb

The Sinking of the USS Indianapolis

July 30, 2020, marks the 75th Anniversary of the sinking of the USS Indianapolis. Today’s post comes from Michael J. Hancock, archives technician at the National Archives at College Park, MD. Sometimes a movie can provide a history lesson in its story arc—an event that few in the audience are familiar with. Such is the … Continue reading The Sinking of the USS Indianapolis

The Italian Service Units of World War II in Boston

Today’s post comes from Joseph P. Keefe, an archives specialist at the National Archives at Boston. In November 1942, following the Allies successful invasion of North Africa, over 51,000 Italian prisoners of war were sent to the United States to POW camps. On September 3, 1943, Allied forces made amphibious landings on the mainland of Italy, … Continue reading The Italian Service Units of World War II in Boston