Chinese Exclusion and the 1899 National Export Exposition: Imagining the View from Inside an Ethnographic Showcase

Today's post comes from Maria Adamson, a history education graduate student at Temple University. Maria interned with the National Archives at Philadelphia virtually this fall as a part of the Cultural Fieldwork Initiative (CFI), a partnership with the Temple University College of Education Social Studies faculty and more than 30 regional cultural institutions. The Research … Continue reading Chinese Exclusion and the 1899 National Export Exposition: Imagining the View from Inside an Ethnographic Showcase

Recognizing Service: How to Determine Entitlement to Medals

Today’s post comes from Thomas Richardson, an archives technician at the National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis, Missouri. It is part of a series on records at the National Personnel Records Center. Awards and decorations of the United States Armed Forces can be beautifully complex and informative. New awards are established, and existing ones … Continue reading Recognizing Service: How to Determine Entitlement to Medals

Honoring Heroes: The Award Card Record Series

Today’s post comes from Thomas Richardson, an archives technician at the National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis, Missouri. It is the part of a series on records at the National Personnel Records Center. In 1973, when an infamous fire ripped through the National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis, Missouri, thousands of records were … Continue reading Honoring Heroes: The Award Card Record Series

Becoming Bigger and Better: The NPRC After the Great Fire of 1973

Today’s post comes from Thomas Richardson, an archives technician at the National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis, MO. It's the first in a series of posts on the National Personnel Records Center. Special thanks to Bryan McGraw, Director of the Personnel Records Division, whose interview provided historical information about the center following the fire, … Continue reading Becoming Bigger and Better: The NPRC After the Great Fire of 1973

Exploring Irish History Through the Famine Files and Other Arrival Records

We're wrapping up Irish American Heritage Month. Today's post comes from Chris Gushman, Archives Director, and Dorothy Dougherty, Programs Director, at the National Archives at New York City. The National Archives and Records Administration’s (NARA) Access to Archival Databases (AAD) launched nearly 20 years ago, providing free public access to several series of government records … Continue reading Exploring Irish History Through the Famine Files and Other Arrival Records

Using NARA’s Index to Naturalizations of World War I Soldiers

November 11 is Veterans Day. Visit the National Archives website for more resources on records related to Veterans. Today's post comes from Grace Schultz, an archivist at the National Archives at Philadelphia. Did your immigrant ancestor naturalize after serving in World War I? If so, you may have used NARA’s Index to Naturalizations of World … Continue reading Using NARA’s Index to Naturalizations of World War I Soldiers

The Birth of an Eternal Document: The Point Elliott Treaty

Today’s post comes from Tessa Campbell, senior curator at the Hibulb Cultural Center located on the Tulalip Reservation. The Tulalip Reservation is located in the State of Washington, 30 miles north of Seattle, and is the name of a place; not the name of a people. Their current exhibit, The Power of Words: A History … Continue reading The Birth of an Eternal Document: The Point Elliott Treaty

Navigating the Law: The Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 and the Trials of a Journey Home

Today’s post comes from Andrew Salyer, an archives technician at the National Archives at Philadelphia. The U.S. Congress passed the first Chinese Exclusion Act in 1882, though the conditions its passage sought to remediate had been brewing as early as the 1850s. From the 1850s to the 1880s, Chinese workers migrated to the United States and … Continue reading Navigating the Law: The Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 and the Trials of a Journey Home

The Italian Service Units of World War II in Boston

Today’s post comes from Joseph P. Keefe, an archives specialist at the National Archives at Boston. In November 1942, following the Allies successful invasion of North Africa, over 51,000 Italian prisoners of war were sent to the United States to POW camps. On September 3, 1943, Allied forces made amphibious landings on the mainland of Italy, … Continue reading The Italian Service Units of World War II in Boston

Letter from Harriet B. Denby, Augusta, Ga. to “Dear Mother,” September 22, 1864

Today’s post comes from Dorothy Dougherty, Programs Director at the National Archives at New York City. “Dear Mother,” starts the letter from Harriet B. Denby, to her mother-in-law, Elizabeth Denby of Augusta, Georgia. This beautiful handwritten four-page letter reminds us about compassion, gratitude, and the enduring lessons mothers teach us about love.  Letter from Harriet … Continue reading Letter from Harriet B. Denby, Augusta, Ga. to “Dear Mother,” September 22, 1864