Mr. and Mrs. Claus Were Not Communists

Today's post comes from Alan Walker, an archivist at the National Archives at College Park. Ha, you probably thought I was speaking of that jolly old elf and the missus. Nope. This story begins in 1936, soon after the publication of what would become a standard: Consumers Union Reports. It was the first publication devoted … Continue reading Mr. and Mrs. Claus Were Not Communists

Notorious RBG at the National Archives

This year we have Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s returning to the National Archives on December 14, 2018, for our annual Bill of Rights Day naturalization ceremony. Today's post comes from Danielle Sklarew in the National Archives History Office. When Ruth Bader Ginsburg visited the National Archives on August 26, 1993—16 days after she … Continue reading Notorious RBG at the National Archives

My Fellow Americans: Bill of Rights Day at the National Archives

December 15 is Bill of Rights Day, which commemorates the ratification of the first 10 amendments to the U.S. Constitution. For more information on events and resources at the National Archives, visit our Bill of Rights Day website. "I hereby declare, on oath, that I absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity … Continue reading My Fellow Americans: Bill of Rights Day at the National Archives

The Rubenstein Gallery: Five Years of Celebrating Citizens’ Rights

This month marks the five-year anniversary of the David M. Rubenstein Gallery at the National Archives. Today’s post come from Michael J. Hancock in the National Archives History Office. Magna Carta is the benchmark by which the principles of democracy are tested. Written more than 800 years ago, the document codified the fundamental truths that … Continue reading The Rubenstein Gallery: Five Years of Celebrating Citizens’ Rights

“Observations” of Native American Records at the National Archives

November is Native American Heritage Month. Visit National Archives News for more information on related events and resources. In 1972 the National Archives held a conference on the history of the Federal Government’s relationship with Native Americans. The Archives held—and still holds—a vast amount of material documenting Native Americans, so it was only natural to … Continue reading “Observations” of Native American Records at the National Archives

Hispanic Heritage Month at the National Archives | Mes de la Herencia Hispana en los Archivos Nacionales

Today’s post comes from Anayeli Nunez at the National Archives and is available in both English and Spanish. Each year the National Archives coordinates a number of public events—film screenings, guest speakers, and even musical performances—in celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month. These events all highlight the history and culture of Hispanic individuals and their tremendous contributions … Continue reading Hispanic Heritage Month at the National Archives | Mes de la Herencia Hispana en los Archivos Nacionales

New Online Exhibit: The “Old Navy” Prints and Watercolors

Today’s post comes from Megan Huang from the National Archives History Office. Besides his role as President during two of the greatest crises in American history, Franklin D. Roosevelt is also famous for having been a collector. Well-known as a collector of stamps, Roosevelt also carefully accumulated a vast amount of paraphernalia relating to the … Continue reading New Online Exhibit: The “Old Navy” Prints and Watercolors

The origins of the Society of American Archivists

As the Society for American Archivists (SAA) meets for the 82nd annual meeting here in Washington, DC, we’re taking a look back at the origins of the organization. SAA was founded just two years after Congress created the National Archives and came to be, in part, because the efforts of National Archives staff. The nation's … Continue reading The origins of the Society of American Archivists