Sam Anthony Brightened NARA

Today’s post comes from Rebecca Brenner Graham, a former 2015-2016 intern in the History Office at the National Archives in Washington, DC. Sam Anthony passed away last week after a long battle with cancer. This post was originally written in 2015 and recently edited. Sam asked we hold publication until after he was gone. Sam … Continue reading Sam Anthony Brightened NARA

The National Archives in Hawaii

May is Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month. Check out our website for more information about our events and resources.  After the passage of the Federal Records Act of 1950, San Francisco was one of first three locations across the country to get a Federal Records Center (FRC). FRCs were essentially large warehouses for … Continue reading The National Archives in Hawaii

An American Symbol Forged from the Progressive Era: The National Archives Building

The National Archives Building in Washington, DC, is on the National Register of Historic Places and is currently being considered for National Historic Landmark Status. A virtual program on the nomination will be held at noon (ET) on Thursday, April 29, 2021. Register here. The historical community had long lobbied for a National Archives without … Continue reading An American Symbol Forged from the Progressive Era: The National Archives Building

Exploring Irish History Through the Famine Files and Other Arrival Records

We're wrapping up Irish American Heritage Month. Today's post comes from Chris Gushman, Archives Director, and Dorothy Dougherty, Programs Director, at the National Archives at New York City. The National Archives and Records Administration’s (NARA) Access to Archival Databases (AAD) launched nearly 20 years ago, providing free public access to several series of government records … Continue reading Exploring Irish History Through the Famine Files and Other Arrival Records

19th Amendment at 100: Ruth Bader Ginsburg

The 19th Amendment was ratified in 1920, but this landmark event was neither the beginning nor the end of the story for women and their struggle for the right to vote. Join us in 2020 as we commemorate this centennial year with 12 stories from our holdings for you to save, print, or share. October’s … Continue reading 19th Amendment at 100: Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Notorious RBG Remembered

Today's post remembers Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. It was adapted from a 2018 post when she visited the National Archives for a naturalization ceremony. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, affectionately known as RBG, was a frequent visitor and a good friend to the National Archives. Chief Justice William Rehnquist swearing in Ruth … Continue reading Notorious RBG Remembered

The Entire Constitution for Constitution Day

September 17 is Constitution Day commemorating the signing of the U.S. Constitution in Philadelphia on September 17, 1787.  Fifty years ago, all four pages of the U.S. Constitution went on display at the National Archives for the first time.  First exhibit of all four pages of the U.S. Constitution in the National Archives Rotunda, 9/17/1970. … Continue reading The Entire Constitution for Constitution Day

Facial Hair Friday: Meyer Fishbein

Fifty years ago, the National Archives accessioned its first electronic record. This happened in large part due to the work of longtime staff member Meyer Fishbein. Fishbein worked at the National Archives for nearly 40 years, often sporting a mustache or a beard.  Meyer Fishbein was born May 6, 1916, in New York City. After … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: Meyer Fishbein

The Mosler Model

On June 29, 1954, a 600 pound model of the vault that held the Constitution, Declaration of Independence, and Bill of Rights went on display in the National Archives Building in Washington, DC. It was one of two models the Mosler Safe Company made to demonstrate how such a mechanism would work to secure the … Continue reading The Mosler Model

Gone with the Wind

In January 1941, the National Archives accepted a copy of the award-winning—and controversial—film Gone with the Wind. Senator Walter F. George of Georgia and Loews Eastern Division Manager Carter Barron presented the donation to the first Archivist of the United States, R.D.W. Connor, in his office.  Archivist of the United States R. D. W. Connor … Continue reading Gone with the Wind