Heated to Ignition: The 1978 Suitland Film Vault Fire

Today's post comes from Joseph Gillette, a processing archivist at the National Archives at College Park, MD. Fire damage inside the Suitland nitrate film vault, 1978. (Records of the National Archives) A date which will live in infamy . . . On December 7, 1978, a fire occurred at the National Archives and Records Service … Continue reading Heated to Ignition: The 1978 Suitland Film Vault Fire

Thanksgiving Aboard the Freedom Train

The Freedom Train was a seven-car train that traveled across the United States from September 1947 until January 1949. It was dedicated to the history of American democracy and contained some of the country's most priceless historical documents, many from the National Archives.  The Freedom Train, 1948. (Records of the American Heritage Foundation, National Archives) … Continue reading Thanksgiving Aboard the Freedom Train

Explore “Our Neighborhood”

The National Archives History Office has published a new online exhibit, "The History of Our Neighborhood." Today's post comes from Rachel Rosenfeld from the National Archives History Office. The National Archives Building in Washington, DC, sits halfway between the Capitol and the White House on Pennsylvania Avenue, but the building wasn’t always there. In fact, … Continue reading Explore “Our Neighborhood”

The Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House and the National Archives at New York City

The National Archives is celebrating American Archives Month throughout October. Follow us on social media, and share your archives stories using the hashtag #ArchivesMonth. Today's post comes from Michael J. Hancock from the National Archives History Office. The National Archives History Office has published a new online exhibit, The Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House and the … Continue reading The Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House and the National Archives at New York City

Facial Hair Friday: Ansel Adams—Photographer of the American West

September 10, 2019, marks the 40th anniversary of Ansel Adams’s visit to the National Archives. Today's post comes from Vincent Bartholomew in the National Archives History Office. Ansel Adams visits the National Archives to look at some of his work, September 10, 1979. (Records of the National Archives) A keen landscape photographer, the always-bearded Adams … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: Ansel Adams—Photographer of the American West

Pneumatic Tube Transport

Pneumatic tubes were once a ubiquitous feature of Federal buildings both in Washington, DC, and around the country. Eleanor Ernest taking a cylinder with telegrams from the pneumatic tube in which they have been sent across several blocks by air pressure, Washington, DC, June 1943. (Photo courtesy of the Library of Congress) The National Archives … Continue reading Pneumatic Tube Transport

Positives and Negatives

This post documents the survey of photographic materials for transfer from Federal agencies to the newly created National Archives in the mid-1930s. Surveys were conducted while the National Archives Building in Washington, DC, was still being constructed. Today’s post comes from Joseph Gillette, a processing archivist at the National Archives at College Park, MD. Between … Continue reading Positives and Negatives

The Story of the Faulkner Murals

On Tuesday, July 2, 2019, Lester Gorelic gave a talk in the William G. McGowan Theater in the National Archives Building in Washington, DC, on The Faulkner Murals: Revealing Their Stories. It is available for viewing on YouTube. In 2014 the National Archives' Prologue magazine published Lester Gorelic’s article, The Faulkner Murals: Depicting the Creation … Continue reading The Story of the Faulkner Murals

Waldo G. Leland: A Founder of the National Archives

Today’s post comes from Michael J. Hancock from the National Archives History Office. Waldo Leland Portrait. (Records of the National Archives) In the hallowed halls of the National Archives you’ll find portraits of the distinguished line of Archivists of the United States. They almost seem to look back at you with a sense of pride … Continue reading Waldo G. Leland: A Founder of the National Archives

Facial Hair Friday: General Winfield Scott Hancock

Today is Facial Hair Friday, and we’re taking a look back at Union General Winfield Scott Hancock, whose statue sits across the street from the National Archives Building in Washington, DC. Today’s post comes from Michael J. Hancock in the National Archives History Office. When you think of the name Hancock, the image of an … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: General Winfield Scott Hancock