Waldo G. Leland: A Founder of the National Archives

Today’s post comes from Michael J. Hancock from the National Archives History Office. Waldo Leland Portrait. (Records of the National Archives) In the hallowed halls of the National Archives you’ll find portraits of the distinguished line of Archivists of the United States. They almost seem to look back at you with a sense of pride … Continue reading Waldo G. Leland: A Founder of the National Archives

Facial Hair Friday: General Winfield Scott Hancock

Today is Facial Hair Friday, and we’re taking a look back at Union General Winfield Scott Hancock, whose statue sits across the street from the National Archives Building in Washington, DC. Today’s post comes from Michael J. Hancock in the National Archives History Office. When you think of the name Hancock, the image of an … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: General Winfield Scott Hancock

Lights, Camera, Archives!

Today's post comes from Joseph Gillette, an archivist at the National Archives in College Park.   For many people, the National Archives’ media presence begins and ends with the movie National Treasure. But the Archives has been a centerpiece to many media productions in its history. This was certainly the case during the Golden Age of … Continue reading Lights, Camera, Archives!

Facial Hair Friday: Archivist of the United States Bert Rhoads

Fifth Archivist of the United States James Berton “Bert” Rhoads (Archivist: 1968–1979) had many distinctions. He was the youngest person to become Archivist; he started the National Archives annual Fourth of July celebrations; and he presided over the Archives during the largest influx of genealogy researchers during the Roots era. He also sported a nice mustache. … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: Archivist of the United States Bert Rhoads

Josephine Cobb’s Discovery of a Lifetime

March is Women’s History Month! Visit National Archives News to see how we're celebrating. Today’s post comes from Michael Hancock in the National Archives History Office. According to the old saying, a picture is worth a thousand words. But in the case of Josephine Cobb and her 1952 discovery in a Civil War–era photograph, it’s worth … Continue reading Josephine Cobb’s Discovery of a Lifetime

Mr. and Mrs. Claus Were Not Communists

Today's post comes from Alan Walker, an archivist at the National Archives at College Park. Ha, you probably thought I was speaking of that jolly old elf and the missus. Nope. This story begins in 1936, soon after the publication of what would become a standard: Consumers Union Reports. It was the first publication devoted … Continue reading Mr. and Mrs. Claus Were Not Communists

Notorious RBG at the National Archives

This year we have Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s returning to the National Archives on December 14, 2018, for our annual Bill of Rights Day naturalization ceremony. Today's post comes from Danielle Sklarew in the National Archives History Office. When Ruth Bader Ginsburg visited the National Archives on August 26, 1993—16 days after she … Continue reading Notorious RBG at the National Archives