Unratified Amendments: Regulating Child Labor

This is the fourth installment of a series about unratified constitutional amendments. Today we’re looking at an amendment proposed during the Progressive Era to regulate child labor. During the Progressive Era, muckraking journalists and photographers drew public attention to a myriad of America’s social problems, one of them being the exploitation of children. Perhaps most … Continue reading Unratified Amendments: Regulating Child Labor

Unratified Amendments: Protection of Slavery

This is the third installment of a series about unratified constitutional amendments. Today we’re looking at an amendment proposed during the lead-up to the U.S. Civil War that would have protected the institution of slavery. When the second session of the 36th Congress convened in late 1860, the issue of slavery had grown increasingly divisive, … Continue reading Unratified Amendments: Protection of Slavery

Unratified Amendments: Titles of Nobility

This is the second installment of a series about unratified constitutional amendments. Today we’re looking at an amendment proposed during the lead-up to the War of 1812 that sought to bar U.S. citizens from accepting titles of nobility.  The U.S. Constitution has a Titles of Nobility clause that prohibits the Federal Government from granting titles … Continue reading Unratified Amendments: Titles of Nobility

Unratified Amendments

To date, the U.S. Constitution has 27 amendments. The first 10 are known as the Bill of Rights, then the rest generally protect and expand individual rights or outline how government works. Congress, however, has actually proposed 33 constitutional amendments to the states. The Bill of Rights as proposed to the states containing 12 amendments, … Continue reading Unratified Amendments

Constitution Day 1985 and Ross Perot’s Magna Carta

Before David M. Rubenstein owned the 1297 Magna Carta, it belonged to Texas billionaire H. Ross Perot, who for decades generously loaned it to the National Archives. On September 17, 1985—Constitution Day—Perot came to the National Archives to visit his Magna Carta, and address new U.S. citizens. Sadly in July 2019, Ross Perot passed away at … Continue reading Constitution Day 1985 and Ross Perot’s Magna Carta

The Story of the Faulkner Murals

On Tuesday, July 2, 2019, Lester Gorelic gave a talk in the William G. McGowan Theater in the National Archives Building in Washington, DC, on The Faulkner Murals: Revealing Their Stories. It is available for viewing on YouTube. In 2014 the National Archives' Prologue magazine published Lester Gorelic’s article, The Faulkner Murals: Depicting the Creation … Continue reading The Story of the Faulkner Murals

Alexander Hamilton and the Constitution

September 17 is Constitution Day. Celebrate the Constitution by visiting the original document at the National Archives. While you are here, don’t miss your last chance to see the special Alexander Hamilton exhibit, which closes September 19, 2018. Alexander Hamilton was only 30 years old when he was selected to serve as one of New … Continue reading Alexander Hamilton and the Constitution

Bill of Rights Day: The People’s Vote

December 15 is Bill of Rights Day, which commemorates the ratification of the first 10 amendments to the U.S. Constitution. Today’s post comes from Bailey Martin from the National Archives History Office. December 15, Bill of Rights Day, is an important day for the National Archives because it is the one day of the year … Continue reading Bill of Rights Day: The People’s Vote

Constitution Day through the years

September 17 is designated as Constitution Day and Citizenship Day to commemorate the signing of the U.S. Constitution in Philadelphia on September 17, 1787! Today’s post comes from Rebecca Watford from the National Archives History Office. As the keeper of the U.S. Constitution, the National Archives has a long tradition of celebrating Constitution Day.   … Continue reading Constitution Day through the years