Constitution Day 1985 and Ross Perot’s Magna Carta

Before David M. Rubenstein owned the 1297 Magna Carta, it belonged to Texas billionaire H. Ross Perot, who for decades generously loaned it to the National Archives. On September 17, 1985—Constitution Day—Perot came to the National Archives to visit his Magna Carta, and address new U.S. citizens. Sadly in July 2019, Ross Perot passed away at … Continue reading Constitution Day 1985 and Ross Perot’s Magna Carta

The Story of the Faulkner Murals

On Tuesday, July 2, 2019, Lester Gorelic gave a talk in the William G. McGowan Theater in the National Archives Building in Washington, DC, on The Faulkner Murals: Revealing Their Stories. It is available for viewing on YouTube. In 2014 the National Archives' Prologue magazine published Lester Gorelic’s article, The Faulkner Murals: Depicting the Creation … Continue reading The Story of the Faulkner Murals

Alexander Hamilton and the Constitution

September 17 is Constitution Day. Celebrate the Constitution by visiting the original document at the National Archives. While you are here, don’t miss your last chance to see the special Alexander Hamilton exhibit, which closes September 19, 2018. Alexander Hamilton was only 30 years old when he was selected to serve as one of New … Continue reading Alexander Hamilton and the Constitution

Bill of Rights Day: The People’s Vote

December 15 is Bill of Rights Day, which commemorates the ratification of the first 10 amendments to the U.S. Constitution. Today’s post comes from Bailey Martin from the National Archives History Office. December 15, Bill of Rights Day, is an important day for the National Archives because it is the one day of the year … Continue reading Bill of Rights Day: The People’s Vote

Constitution Day through the years

September 17 is designated as Constitution Day and Citizenship Day to commemorate the signing of the U.S. Constitution in Philadelphia on September 17, 1787! Today’s post comes from Rebecca Watford from the National Archives History Office. As the keeper of the U.S. Constitution, the National Archives has a long tradition of celebrating Constitution Day.   … Continue reading Constitution Day through the years

A Constitution Day reminder

Dear Federal Colleagues—on Constitution Day we here at the National Archives are happily tasked with promoting the United States Constitution . . . and you are too! Why? Because of an act of Congress that was the brainchild of Senator Robert C. Byrd (1917–2010). Senator Byrd loved the Constitution. He studied it in college. He … Continue reading A Constitution Day reminder

George Mason and the origins of the Bill of Rights

Today’s post comes from Austin McManus with the National Archives History Office. Come see our traveling exhibition, "Amending America: The Bill of Rights," at George Mason's Gunston Hall through October 21, 2017. One of the documents on display in the Rotunda in the National Archives is the Bill of Rights, the first 10 amendments to the … Continue reading George Mason and the origins of the Bill of Rights

Last chance to see Amending America

Today’s post comes from Christine Blackerby, archives specialist in the Center for Legislative Archives at the National Archives in Washington, DC. She is also co-curator of the exhibit “Amending America.” More than 11,000 constitutional amendments have been introduced in Congress since the Constitution was written in 1787. What most of these proposals have in common, … Continue reading Last chance to see Amending America

Putting the “Rat” in Ratification: Tennessee’s role in the 19th amendment

In 1878 Senator Aaron A. Sargent introduced into Congress a resolution proposing a constitutional amendment granting women the right to vote. On June 4, 1919,  after 40 years—and much effort and debate—Congress passed, by a two-thirds vote of both houses, that proposed amendment. It was then up to the states to ratify it.  Many states … Continue reading Putting the “Rat” in Ratification: Tennessee’s role in the 19th amendment