Facial Hair Friday: Hiram Revels

Today’s Facial Hair Friday is about Hiram Rhodes Revels, the first African American to serve in Congress and the first African American Senator. It’s from Rachel Bartgis, conservator technician at the National Archives at College Park, MD. First African-American Senator Hiram Revels. (National Archives Identifier 594264) Hiram Revels was born in Fayetteville, North Carolina, in … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: Hiram Revels

Enslaved Women of the Confederate Nitre Works

Today’s post comes from Rachel Bartgis, conservator technician at the National Archives at College Park, Maryland. During the U.S. Civil War, the manufacture of gunpowder became a serious concern for the Confederacy. While there were several powder mills located in the country, the United States had imported most of the wood ash, sulfur, and saltpeter … Continue reading Enslaved Women of the Confederate Nitre Works

Confederate Slave Payrolls

Today’s post comes from Rachel Bartgis, conservator technician at the National Archives at College Park, Maryland. During the U.S. Civil War, the Confederate Army required enslavers to loan their enslaved people to the military. Throughout the Confederacy from Florida to Virginia, these enslaved people served as cooks and laundresses, labored in deadly conditions to mine … Continue reading Confederate Slave Payrolls

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Facial Hair Friday: Robert Gould Shaw

Today's Facial Hair Friday candidate is Robert Gould Shaw, whose moustaches are probably best known because of his portrayal by Matthew Broderick in the 1989 film Glory. This post is from Rachel Bartgis, conservator technician at the National Archives at College Park, MD. Robert Gould Shaw, ca. 1861-1863. (National Archives Identifier 529814) Robert Gould Shaw … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: Robert Gould Shaw

International Archives Week—Charles Sprout: A Civil War Soldier Revisited

This week is International Archives Week #IAW2021, time set aside by the International Council on Archives (ICA) to celebrate the founding of ICA in 1948. This year’s theme is #EmpoweringArchives. Today’s post comes from Bryan Cheeseboro, an archives technician at the National Archives in Washington, DC.   The National Archives has created a short documentary Charles … Continue reading International Archives Week—Charles Sprout: A Civil War Soldier Revisited

Celebrating Irish Americans: The Fenian Brotherhood

March is Irish American Heritage Month, and we're taking a look at one of the more curious incidents in Irish American history: when Irish Americans attacked Canada! Today’s post comes from Rachel Bartgis, conservator technician at the National Archives at College Park, MD. John Francis O'Mahony, ca. 1861-1865. (National Archives Identifier 526300) In the wake … Continue reading Celebrating Irish Americans: The Fenian Brotherhood

USS Monitor Gun Carriages

March 8–9, 2021, marks the 159th anniversary of the Battle of Hampton Roads, also known as the Battle of the Monitor and Merrimack. This battle is significant as the first fight between two ironclad warships, USS Monitor and CSS Virginia. Today’s post comes from Rachel Bartgis, conservator technician at the National Archives at College Park, MD. … Continue reading USS Monitor Gun Carriages

Facial Hair Friday: Women Soldiers in the U.S. Civil War

It’s Facial Hair Friday, and we’re taking a look at women who fought as soldiers during the U.S. Civil War! Today’s post comes from Rachel Bartgis, conservator technician at the National Archives at College Park, MD. Lt. Harry J. Buford, aka Loreta Janeta Velázquez. (Courtesy of the Library of Congress) While some female soldiers such … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: Women Soldiers in the U.S. Civil War

Facial Hair Friday: Donehogawa (Ely S. Parker)

Today’s Facial Hair Friday is about Donehogawa, otherwise known as Ely S. Parker, the first Native American to be Commissioner of Indian Affairs.  Ely S. Parker was born a Seneca Indian in 1828 in Western New York on the then Tonawanda Reservation. Originally called Hasanoanda, he was baptized as Ely Samuel Parker. Educated in missionary schools, … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: Donehogawa (Ely S. Parker)

Letter from Harriet B. Denby, Augusta, Ga. to “Dear Mother,” September 22, 1864

Today’s post comes from Dorothy Dougherty, Programs Director at the National Archives at New York City. “Dear Mother,” starts the letter from Harriet B. Denby, to her mother-in-law, Elizabeth Denby of Augusta, Georgia. This beautiful handwritten four-page letter reminds us about compassion, gratitude, and the enduring lessons mothers teach us about love.  Letter from Harriet … Continue reading Letter from Harriet B. Denby, Augusta, Ga. to “Dear Mother,” September 22, 1864