Letter from Harriet B. Denby, Augusta, Ga. to “Dear Mother,” September 22, 1864

Today’s post comes from Dorothy Dougherty, Programs Director at the National Archives at New York City. “Dear Mother,” starts the letter from Harriet B. Denby, to her mother-in-law, Elizabeth Denby of Augusta, Georgia. This beautiful handwritten four-page letter reminds us about compassion, gratitude, and the enduring lessons mothers teach us about love.  Letter from Harriet … Continue reading Letter from Harriet B. Denby, Augusta, Ga. to “Dear Mother,” September 22, 1864

FOUND: Civil War Pension file for the “Lost Soldier of Chickamauga”

National Archives News recently posted a two-part story on the Civil War pension file of Hugh Thompson, the “Lost Soldier of Chickamauga.” Today’s post, from Dena Lombardo, an intern in the Public and Media Communications office, tells more of the story.    Recently, National Archives staff uncovered the largest Civil War pension file in our holdings. … Continue reading FOUND: Civil War Pension file for the “Lost Soldier of Chickamauga”

Teacher, Principal, and Inventor Clarissa Britain

To commemorate National Women’s Inventor’s Month and celebrate women innovators, we are highlighting Civil War–era inventor Clarissa Britain. Britain secured patents for seven inventions within 18 months. Today's post comes from Jen Johnson, curator at the National Archives at Kansas City. Britain's Patent No. 40,157, Improvements in boilers, October 6, 1863. (Records of the Patent and … Continue reading Teacher, Principal, and Inventor Clarissa Britain

National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers

November 11 is Veterans Day. Visit the National Archives website to learn more about our resources and events related to the holiday. Today’s post comes from Shannon O'Malley, a Digitization and Metadata Intern at the National Archives at Philadelphia.  President Abraham Lincoln signed the bipartisan bill establishing the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers in March 1865. … Continue reading National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers

Facial Hair Friday: John Brown

Today is Facial Hair Friday, and we’re looking back at abolitionist John Brown. Today’s post comes from Vincent Bartholomew in the National Archives History Office. John Brown, ca. 1858. (National Archives Identifier 23855306) Abolitionist John Brown, who was previously clean shaven, grew a robust beard during his preparations for the raid on Harpers Ferry as … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: John Brown

Facial Hair Friday: General Winfield Scott Hancock

Today is Facial Hair Friday, and we’re taking a look back at Union General Winfield Scott Hancock, whose statue sits across the street from the National Archives Building in Washington, DC. Today’s post comes from Michael J. Hancock in the National Archives History Office. When you think of the name Hancock, the image of an … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: General Winfield Scott Hancock

Words As Powerful As Bullets: Diplomats during the U.S. Civil War

Today’s blog post comes from Paige Weaver from the History Office of the National Archives. When most people think about the U.S. Civil War, they typically consider it a purely American affair that pitted the geographic regions of the North versus the South. Yet, this so-called “War Between the States” was hardly limited to the … Continue reading Words As Powerful As Bullets: Diplomats during the U.S. Civil War

Dr. Mary E. Walker

March is Women's History Month! Today's post comes from Holly Rivet, an archives technician at the National Archives at St. Louis. Few women became physicians in the 1850s; fewer still served in the Civil War; and only one was awarded the Medal of Honor. Dr. Mary E. Walker was born in 1832 in Oswego, New … Continue reading Dr. Mary E. Walker

Josephine Cobb’s Discovery of a Lifetime

March is Women’s History Month! Visit National Archives News to see how we're celebrating. Today’s post comes from Michael Hancock in the National Archives History Office. According to the old saying, a picture is worth a thousand words. But in the case of Josephine Cobb and her 1952 discovery in a Civil War–era photograph, it’s worth … Continue reading Josephine Cobb’s Discovery of a Lifetime

Facial Hair Friday: Percy Wyndham, Soldier Extraordinaire

Today’s post comes from Megan Huang, an intern in the National Archives History Office. Today's Facial Hair Friday is about a little-known Civil War Union officer, Col. Percy Wyndham, who has a perfectly pointed beard and mustache. An Englishman, Wyndham did not have the the usual path to participation in the American Civil War. Perhaps being … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: Percy Wyndham, Soldier Extraordinaire