Jackie Robinson’s 100th

We're wrapping up African American History Month. Visit the National Archives website for more information on our resources related to African American History. Today’s post comes from James Worsham, editor in the Communications and Marketing Division of the National Archives. Jackie Robinson, the first African American to play in modern major league baseball, would have been 100 … Continue reading Jackie Robinson’s 100th

The “Roots” of Genealogy at the National Archives

February is African American History Month. Visit the National Archives website for more information on our resources related to African American History. In 1964, writer and historian Alex Haley visited the National Archives to research his family history. Looking in the 1870 census records for Alamance County, NC, he was able to confirm some details he heard … Continue reading The “Roots” of Genealogy at the National Archives

Facial Hair Friday: Joseph Rainey the first African American in the House

  Joseph Rainey was distinguished in many ways—he was the first African American to serve in the U.S. House of Representatives, the first African American to preside over the House of Representatives, and the longest–serving African American during Reconstruction. He also had pretty nice mutton chops. Rainey was born into slavery in 1832 in Georgetown, … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: Joseph Rainey the first African American in the House

LBJ and MLK

We are wrapping up our commemoration of Black History Month. Today’s post comes from Madie Ward in the National Archives History Office. The National Archives has countless items that highlight African Americans’ struggles for freedom and civil liberties. Included are documents on the Civil Rights Movement and, more specifically, on President Lyndon B. Johnson and Dr. … Continue reading LBJ and MLK

His was “Service Honest and Faithful, Character Excellent”

Today’s post comes from John P. Blair with the National Archives History Office. Ever since President Gerald Ford recognized Black History Month during the Bicentennial of the United States in 1976, each February brings forth a celebration of the history and accomplishments of notable African Americans. However, there are hundreds of thousands of other African … Continue reading His was “Service Honest and Faithful, Character Excellent”

Bienvenue à Port-au-Prince, Monsieur Douglass

Today’s post comes from John P. Blair with the National Archives History Office. This year marks the 200th anniversary of the birth of Frederick Douglass, arguably America’s most accomplished African American civil rights leader of the 19th century. As we recognize the contributions of African Americans during Black History Month, we are reminded that on … Continue reading Bienvenue à Port-au-Prince, Monsieur Douglass