James Baldwin and Freedom Summer

We’re wrapping up Black History Month with a post from Adam Berenbak, an archivist in the Center for Legislative Archives. Novelist, essayist, poet, and activist James Baldwin (1924–87) “created works of literary beauty and depth that will remain essential parts of the American canon.”[1] He was an openly gay, Black man living in the Civil … Continue reading James Baldwin and Freedom Summer

Victory at Home and Abroad: Combating Segregation in the Armed Forces

February is Black History Month. Visit our website for information on related resources and virtual events. Today’s post comes from Thomas Richardson, an archives technician at the National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis, MO. The valiant effort of those who fought and sacrificed themselves in the line of duty during World War II is … Continue reading Victory at Home and Abroad: Combating Segregation in the Armed Forces

The Fight for the Right to Marry: The Loving v. Virginia Case

February is Black History Month. Visit our website for information on related resources and virtual events. Today’s post comes from Thomas Richardson, an archives technician at the National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis, MO. Civil rights encompasses a broad range of activities that engage citizens of all backgrounds—the right to vote, to lawfully assemble, … Continue reading The Fight for the Right to Marry: The Loving v. Virginia Case

Facial Hair Friday: The Honorable Thurgood Marshall

Join us today @USNatArchives on Twitter and Instagram for the #ArchivesHashtagParty #ArchivesBlackEducation. We will be sharing stories from our Rediscovering Black History blog and our online Catalog. Thurgood Marshall, 6/13/1967. (National Archives Identifier 2803441) Thurgood Marshall was leader in the struggle against racial discrimination in the United States for a good part of the 20th … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: The Honorable Thurgood Marshall

The Gridlock of Racial Segregation: When the Light Turns from Brown to Green

In celebration of Black History Month, we are taking a look at the landmark case Green v. New Kent County. Today’s post comes from Michael J. Hancock, archives technician at the National Archives at College Park, MD. There was a time when “freedom of choice” was no choice at all. After the landmark case Brown … Continue reading The Gridlock of Racial Segregation: When the Light Turns from Brown to Green

Marjorie S. Joyner: More than an Inventor

Marjorie S. Joyner’s patent is on display as the National Archives Museum’s Featured Document celebrating National Women's Inventors Month through March 18. Today's post comes from Jen Johnson, a curator at the National Archives at Kansas City. Born in 1896 in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia, Marjorie Stewart and her family moved to Ohio, then … Continue reading Marjorie S. Joyner: More than an Inventor

19th Amendment at 100: Mary Church Terrell

The 19th Amendment was ratified in 1920, but this landmark event was neither the beginning nor the end of the story for women and their struggle for the right to vote. Join us in 2020 as we commemorate this centennial year with 12 stories from our holdings for you to save, print, or share. February’s … Continue reading 19th Amendment at 100: Mary Church Terrell

Jackie Robinson’s 100th

We're wrapping up African American History Month. Visit the National Archives website for more information on our resources related to African American History. Today’s post comes from James Worsham, editor in the Communications and Marketing Division of the National Archives. Jackie Robinson, the first African American to play in modern major league baseball, would have been 100 … Continue reading Jackie Robinson’s 100th

The “Roots” of Genealogy at the National Archives

February is African American History Month. Visit the National Archives website for more information on our resources related to African American History. In 1964, writer and historian Alex Haley visited the National Archives to research his family history. Looking in the 1870 census records for Alamance County, NC, he was able to confirm some details he heard … Continue reading The “Roots” of Genealogy at the National Archives

Facial Hair Friday: Joseph Rainey the first African American in the House

  Joseph Rainey was distinguished in many ways—he was the first African American to serve in the U.S. House of Representatives, the first African American to preside over the House of Representatives, and the longest–serving African American during Reconstruction. He also had pretty nice mutton chops. Rainey was born into slavery in 1832 in Georgetown, … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: Joseph Rainey the first African American in the House