Don Wilson: Embracing Independence

The National Archives was created on June 19, 1934. During the month of June, the National Archives History Office is sharing stories about the former Archivists of the United States. Today's post comes from Sarah Basilion. Don W. Wilson was appointed seventh Archivist of the United States by President Ronald Reagan in 1987. He was the … Continue reading Don Wilson: Embracing Independence

Take a break with Presidential vacations!

Need a vacation? This summer, go on a vacation with 13 of our Presidents!  You can choose your own adventure on Instagram and chat with us on Twitter on August 19 using #POTUSvacation.   Vacations are an integral part of Presidential history, a way for Presidents to relax and recharge outside of Washington. Many of … Continue reading Take a break with Presidential vacations!

Happy “Other” Birthday, National Archives!

President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed legislation establishing the National Archives as an independent agency on June 19, 1934, which is our agency's official "birthday." But, we also celebrate April 1, 1985, as our "other birthday." Why? Read on. Although the National Archives was created as an independent agency, Congress transferred it to the newly created General … Continue reading Happy “Other” Birthday, National Archives!

Annual Message on the State of the Union: The President Speaks

Today’s post comes from Christine Blackerby, an Outreach Specialist at the Center for Legislative Archives at the National Archives in Washington, DC. On January 8, 1790, President George Washington delivered a speech at Federal Hall in New York City. This speech, called his first annual message to Congress (which we now refer to as the State … Continue reading Annual Message on the State of the Union: The President Speaks

Gooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooal!

Today’s post celebrates the international sporting event that captivates billions of people every four years: the World Cup! Brazilian icon Pele is one of the world’s most recognized footballers. He is one of the few players to appear in four World Cup finals and the only player to win three World Cup titles (1958, 1962, … Continue reading Gooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooal!

From the Presidential Libraries: Hanukkah at the White House

Today's guest post comes from Susan K. Donius, Director of the Office of Presidential Libraries at the National Archives. Among the gifts from heads of state that are in the holdings of the Harry S. Truman Presidential Library and Museum is a menorah presented to President Truman by Israel’s first Prime Minister, David Ben-Gurion. The … Continue reading From the Presidential Libraries: Hanukkah at the White House

Archives Spotlight: The Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum

Today's post comes from Nikita Buley, an intern in the National Archives Office of Strategy and Communications. The Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum is located in Simi Valley, California—about 40 miles northwest of Los Angeles—and holds over 60 million pages of documents, 1.6 million photographs, hundreds of thousands of feet of audiovisual material, and … Continue reading Archives Spotlight: The Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum

Thursday Photo Caption Contest—May 10

The clothes must make the man! Last week's photo caption contest winner featured Spring Fashion Week and canvas jumpsuits; this week's winner pokes gentle fun at what our congressmen might look like before they are suited up for work. Duke Blackwood, the Director of the Ronald Reagan Library and Museum, took on his guest judging duties with … Continue reading Thursday Photo Caption Contest—May 10

A Shaky, but Official, Signature

It had not yet been 24 hours since President Ronald Reagan was wounded in an assassination attempt—wounds far more serious than the public was told at the time. But on the morning of March 31, 1981, the three men he relied on most in these early days of his administration came to see him in … Continue reading A Shaky, but Official, Signature

Reverse the (Zero) Curse

When Ronald Reagan survived the attempt on his life on March 30, 1981, and went on to serve two full four-year terms, he broke what some people call “the year-ending-in-zero” curse. It goes like this: Every President elected in a year ending in zero since 1840 had died in office. William Henry Harrison, elected in … Continue reading Reverse the (Zero) Curse