Facial Hair Friday: Walt Whitman

Walt Whitman, ca. 1863-1865. (National Archives Identifier 525875) April is National Poetry Month, and today we're looking at one of the most famous American poets of all time: Walt Whitman. In addition to his bushy beard, Walt Whitman is probably best known as the American poet who wrote Leaves of Grass. But you may not … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: Walt Whitman

Facial Hair Friday: Women Soldiers in the U.S. Civil War

It’s Facial Hair Friday, and we’re taking a look at women who fought as soldiers during the U.S. Civil War! Today’s post comes from Rachel Bartgis, conservator technician at the National Archives at College Park, MD. Lt. Harry J. Buford, aka Loreta Janeta Velázquez. (Courtesy of the Library of Congress) While some female soldiers such … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: Women Soldiers in the U.S. Civil War

Facial Hair Friday: The Honorable Thurgood Marshall

Join us today @USNatArchives on Twitter and Instagram for the #ArchivesHashtagParty #ArchivesBlackEducation. We will be sharing stories from our Rediscovering Black History blog and our online Catalog. Thurgood Marshall, 6/13/1967. (National Archives Identifier 2803441) Thurgood Marshall was leader in the struggle against racial discrimination in the United States for a good part of the 20th … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: The Honorable Thurgood Marshall

Facial Hair Friday: Paul Bunyan

In a city park overlooking Lake Bemidji in northern Minnesota sit two larger-than-life statues depicting fictional lumberjack Paul Bunyan and his reliable companion, Babe the Blue Ox. The roadside attraction, created in 1937, is still very popular with tourists to this day.  Statue of Paul Bunyan in Bemidji, Minnesota, 1947. (National Archives Identifier 2129751) The … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: Paul Bunyan

Facial Hair Friday: Tom Selleck

It's Facial Hair Friday, and we’re taking a look at actor Tom Selleck and his iconic mustache. Today’s post comes from Michael J. Hancock, archives technician at the National Archives at College Park, MD. That red Ferrari, that Hawaiian shirt, that theme song, and that bushy mustache! Magnum P.I. was one of the most popular … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: Tom Selleck

Facial Hair Friday: Donehogawa (Ely S. Parker)

Today’s Facial Hair Friday is about Donehogawa, otherwise known as Ely S. Parker, the first Native American to be Commissioner of Indian Affairs.  Ely S. Parker was born a Seneca Indian in 1828 in Western New York on the then Tonawanda Reservation. Originally called Hasanoanda, he was baptized as Ely Samuel Parker. Educated in missionary schools, … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: Donehogawa (Ely S. Parker)

Facial Hair Friday: Frida Kahlo

Aside from her powerful self-portraits, Mexican artist and feminist icon Frida Kahlo is perhaps most known for her unibrow, a purposeful statement rejecting stereotypes about what conventional beauty looks like. She is the subject of today’s Facial Hair Friday.  Magdalena Carmen Frida Kahlo y Calderón was born in 1907 in Coyoacán, Mexico City, Mexico. Known … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: Frida Kahlo

Facial Hair Friday: Meyer Fishbein

Fifty years ago, the National Archives accessioned its first electronic record. This happened in large part due to the work of longtime staff member Meyer Fishbein. Fishbein worked at the National Archives for nearly 40 years, often sporting a mustache or a beard.  Meyer Fishbein was born May 6, 1916, in New York City. After … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: Meyer Fishbein

Facial Hair Friday: Frederick Douglass, Woman Suffrage Activist

100 years ago in August, the 19th Amendment, granting women the right to vote, became law after decades of work from both female and male suffragists. Visit our website to learn more about the history of the woman suffrage movement.  While Frederick Douglass is perhaps most well known as an abolitionist (and for his salt-and-pepper … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: Frederick Douglass, Woman Suffrage Activist

Facial Hair Friday: Born on the Fourth of July

An American author most known for the novels The Scarlet Letter and The House of Seven Gables, Nathaniel Hawthorne was born on July 4, 1804, in Salem, Massachusetts.  Nathaniel Hawthorne, ca. 1862. (National Archives Identifier 530280) In addition to being an author, the facial-haired fiction-writer was also a civil servant. He was a weigher and … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: Born on the Fourth of July