The Medal of Honor

Today's post comes from National Archives Office of Strategy and Communications staff writer Rob Crotty. According to Army Regulation 670-1, a soldier can now receive 31 military decorations "as a distinctively designed mark of honor denoting heroism, or meritorious or outstanding service or achievement." During the Civil War, there was only one: the Medal of … Continue reading The Medal of Honor

Facial Hair Friday: “Howe” do they do it?

We may be a litttle short-staffed on this quasi-holiday, but I couldn't let Facial Hair Friday go by without a nod to some historic beards. Today's honoree is Gen. Albion P. Howe, veteran of the Mexican War and the Civil War. When a captain in the U.S. Army,  Howe served under Col. Robert E. Lee at … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: “Howe” do they do it?

Thanksgiving: Another FDR Experiment

Yesterday we celebrated Thanksgiving, as usual, on the fourth Thursday of November. Today shoppers are hitting the stores for "Black Friday" super discounts to kick off holiday shopping. But until 1939, Thanksgiving Day was traditionally the last Thursday in November. That year there were five Thursdays in the month, and concern about a shortened shopping season prompted President Franklin … Continue reading Thanksgiving: Another FDR Experiment

Thanksgiving, as American as apple pie

Today's post comes from National Archives Office of Strategy and Communications staff writer Rob Crotty. Here, in short, are the documents that made Thanksgiving. On October 3, 1789, President George Washington issued a proclamation naming Thursday, November 26, 1789, as an official holiday of "sincere and humble thanks." The nation then celebrated its first Thanksgiving … Continue reading Thanksgiving, as American as apple pie

Why does the President pardon a turkey?

Today's post comes from National Archives Office of Strategy and Communications staff writer Rob Crotty. As I write this, two turkeys are living it up at the "W" hotel across the street from the White House. The turkeys will be dining at the exclusive POV restaurant (as guests, not as dinner) when they aren't roaming … Continue reading Why does the President pardon a turkey?

Rare photo of Lincoln at Gettysburg

Today's post comes from National Archives Office of Strategy and Communications staff writer Rob Crotty. In 1952, the chief of the Still Photo section at the National Archives, Josephine Cobb, discovered a glass plate negative taken by Mathew Brady of the speaker's stand at Gettysburg on the day of its dedication as a National Cemetery. … Continue reading Rare photo of Lincoln at Gettysburg

Thursday’s Photo Caption Contest

Today's post comes from National Archives Office of Strategy and Communications staff writer Rob Crotty. As we all gear up for the single busiest flying day of the year, let's remember that flying coach back in 1918 was a slightly less predictable affair, particularly if you were "Lieutenant Kirk Booth of the U.S. Signal Corps … Continue reading Thursday’s Photo Caption Contest

The Venus Fixers: The Remarkable Story of the Allied Soldiers Who Saved Italy’s Art During World War II

Ilaria Dagnini Brey is the author of The Venus Fixers, an account of the Monuments Officers, who were assigned by the Allies to preserve and protect the artwork and monuments of Europe from looting and destruction. She is the featured Author on the Record for the Fall 2010 issue of Prologue. We invited her to do … Continue reading The Venus Fixers: The Remarkable Story of the Allied Soldiers Who Saved Italy’s Art During World War II

The must-have Christmas gift of 1864

Today's post comes from National Archives Office of Strategy and Communications staff writer Rob Crotty. Each year in America it seems there is one holiday gift that is heavy on demand and short on supply. In 1996, there was the Tickle-Me-Elmo fiasco. In 1983, it was the Cabbage Patch Doll. In 1864, the gift of … Continue reading The must-have Christmas gift of 1864