Morgantown Ordnance Works Panoramas, 1940-1942

Today’s post comes from Nicholas Novine, a processing intern at the National Archives at Philadelphia. We are pleased to announce that a series of 91 panoramas documenting industrial developments of the Morgantown Ordnance Works at Morgantown, West Virginia have been digitized and are available through our online catalog. Staff at the National Archives at Philadelphia … Continue reading Morgantown Ordnance Works Panoramas, 1940-1942

Mystery lady identified!

Alan Walker, an archivist in the Textual Processing unit in the National Archives at College Park, MD, just solved a mystery that staff have wondered about for many years. Mark down this auspicious date, for I shall reveal to you the identity of this longtime mystery woman. You've probably seen this photo many a time … Continue reading Mystery lady identified!

Doors of Monumental Proportions

Today’s post comes from Jessie Kratz, Historian of the National Archives. On June 24 the National Archives celebrates its 80th anniversary. If you have ever visited the National Archives in Washington, DC, you may have noticed two very, very large bronze doors that mark the original Constitution Avenue entrance to the building. Visitors enter through the … Continue reading Doors of Monumental Proportions

Happy 80th Birthday National Archives

Today's post comes from Jessie Kratz, Historian of the National Archives. June 19 marks the 80th Anniversary of the establishment of the National Archives.  Eighty years ago on June 19, 1934, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed legislation creating the National Archives. It was the culmination of a 25-year campaign by the historical community to create … Continue reading Happy 80th Birthday National Archives

“I was a gunner and a gun captain on a 90MM-AAA gun during World War II…”

Today’s post comes from Alan Walker, archivist at the National Archives in College Park, Maryland. Now, maybe it's happened to you: that "needle in a haystack," "home run," unbelievable find that blew you away, and brought joy to a researcher. We archival folks live for that moment. Let me share with you one such moment … Continue reading “I was a gunner and a gun captain on a 90MM-AAA gun during World War II…”

The 150th Anniversary of the United States Colored Troops

Today's blog post comes from archives specialist Jackie Budell. On May 22, 1863, the War Department issued General Orders 143, establishing a Bureau of Colored Troops in the Adjutant General’s Office to recruit and organize African American soldiers to fight for the Union Army. With this order, all African American regiments were designated as United … Continue reading The 150th Anniversary of the United States Colored Troops

Plucked from our records: Pasquale Taraffo and the Harp Guitar

 Today's post comes from Nikita Buley, an intern in the National Archives Office of Strategy and Communications. “Attachments,” the current exhibit at the National Archives in Washington, DC, tells the stories of some of the millions of people who have entered and left the United States. One visitor, Pasquale Taraffo, came to the United States … Continue reading Plucked from our records: Pasquale Taraffo and the Harp Guitar

More Hitler art albums discovered

This morning in Dallas, TX, the Archivist of the United States David S. Ferriero, Senior Archivist Greg Bradsher, and President of the Monuments Men Foundation Robert M. Edsel announced the discovery of two original albums of photographs of paintings and furniture looted by the Nazis. The Monuments Men Foundation will donate these albums, which have … Continue reading More Hitler art albums discovered

Secession, Congress, and a Civil War Awakening at the Archives

Today's post comes from Gregory Marose, an intern in the National Archives Office of Strategy and Communications. As a new year begins, the 112th Congress reconvenes for a second session of legislative activity. Representatives and senators from across the country are again descending upon the Capitol, ready to commence debates, proceedings, and hearings. This is how … Continue reading Secession, Congress, and a Civil War Awakening at the Archives

Hit the Road, Jack!

Today's post is by Miriam Kleiman, public relations specialist at the National Archives. Jack Kerouac—American counterculture hero, king of the Beats, and author of On the Road—was a Navy military recruit who failed boot camp. Navy doctors found Kerouac delusional, grandiose, and promiscuous, and questioned his strange writing obsession. I learned this in 2005, right … Continue reading Hit the Road, Jack!