The Bill of Rights Goes to the States

On June 8, 1789, less than one year after the U.S. Constitution was ratified, Representative James Madison of Virginia proposed several amendments to the document. The amendments were to be interwoven into the text and were, for the most part, selectively taken from the amendments proposed by the states. They also mostly related to protecting civil … Continue reading The Bill of Rights Goes to the States

America’s First Ladies: In Service to Our Nation

Today's post comes from Elle Benak and Sanjana Barr from the National Archives History Office. On Friday September 16, 2016, the National Archives hosted the "Legacies of America's First Ladies" conference in the William G. McGowan theater in Washington, DC. This was part of an ongoing series first launched in 2011 by American University, who … Continue reading America’s First Ladies: In Service to Our Nation

The “Pocket Constitution” makes a comeback

As we celebrate the 229th birthday of the Constitution, the mini, pocket edition has made a comeback. After Khizr Khan, the father of a Muslim soldier killed in Iraq, waved his pocket Constitution during his speech at the Democratic National Convention, sales have soared and pocket Constitutions are flying off the shelves. I use my pocket … Continue reading The “Pocket Constitution” makes a comeback

The German Foreign Ministry Archive

Today’s post comes from Sonia Kahn in the National Archives History Office. It is part six of a series on the history behind some of the seized foreign records housed at the National Archives. During and immediately following World War II, Allied governments aggressively sought Nazi diplomatic papers. The Allies would use these documents not … Continue reading The German Foreign Ministry Archive

On Exhibit: The Patriot Act

Today’s post comes from Andrew Grafton in the National Archives History Office October 2001, Washington, DC. The United States has recently been attacked by terrorists intent on killing American citizens and striking a blow against U.S. morale in the fight against terror. Millions are afraid that a further attack is imminent. The public is adamant … Continue reading On Exhibit: The Patriot Act

The Personal Files of Benito Mussolini

Today’s post comes from Sonia Kahn in the National Archives History Office. It is part five of a series on the history of some of the seized foreign records housed at the National Archives. Unlike the very systematic seizure and filming of German records, the acquisition of many of the Italian records that made their … Continue reading The Personal Files of Benito Mussolini

Breaking Ground: From Market Stalls to the National Archives Building

Today’s post comes from Sonia Kahn in the National Archives History Office. Today the National Archives Building is a recognizable edifice on Pennsylvania Avenue, but it has not always stood on that site in the nation’s capital. Eighty-five years ago, ground was broken to begin construction on the structure that would house our nation’s records. … Continue reading Breaking Ground: From Market Stalls to the National Archives Building

On Exhibit: An Act to establish the NMAAHC

The Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) officially opens on September 24, 2016, on the National Mall. It is the 19th and newest Smithsonian Institution museum and is devoted to documenting African American life, history, and culture. The museum was established by a December 16, 2003, act of Congress, but efforts to create … Continue reading On Exhibit: An Act to establish the NMAAHC