The National Archives’ larger-than-life statues

Do you want to learn more about the history and architecture of National Archives Building in Washington, DC? Join us online Thursday, May 24, 2018, at noon for a Facebook Live tour of the building’s exterior. For more information, follow us on Facebook! On each side of the National Archives Building in Washington, DC (on … Continue reading The National Archives’ larger-than-life statues

A precedent-breaking inauguration

On January 20, 1941, President Franklin D. Roosevelt made history by being the first President to be inaugurated for a third term. The previous year, Roosevelt had been elected President for the third time, and the inauguration marked the start of his third term in office. No other President in American history had been elected … Continue reading A precedent-breaking inauguration

J. Franklin Jameson: the Father of the National Archives

Today’s post comes from Elle Benak from the National Archives History Office. On December 28, 1954, the American Historical Association dedicated a plaque to J. Franklin Jameson, noting his “persistence and wise guidance” in establishing the National Archives. The plaque still hangs on the wall in the Pennsylvania Avenue entrance of the National Archives Building … Continue reading J. Franklin Jameson: the Father of the National Archives

The “Pocket Constitution” makes a comeback

As we celebrate the 229th birthday of the Constitution, the mini, pocket edition has made a comeback. After Khizr Khan, the father of a Muslim soldier killed in Iraq, waved his pocket Constitution during his speech at the Democratic National Convention, sales have soared and pocket Constitutions are flying off the shelves. I use my pocket … Continue reading The “Pocket Constitution” makes a comeback

Breaking Ground: From Market Stalls to the National Archives Building

Today’s post comes from Sonia Kahn in the National Archives History Office. Today the National Archives Building is a recognizable edifice on Pennsylvania Avenue, but it has not always stood on that site in the nation’s capital. Eighty-five years ago, ground was broken to begin construction on the structure that would house our nation’s records. … Continue reading Breaking Ground: From Market Stalls to the National Archives Building

John W. Carlin: Bringing the National Archives into the 21st Century

The National Archives was created on June 19, 1934. During the month of June, the National Archives History Office is sharing stories about the former Archivists of the United States. Today's post comes from Sarah Basilion. John W. Carlin was appointed eighth Archivist of the United States by President Bill Clinton in 1995 and served in … Continue reading John W. Carlin: Bringing the National Archives into the 21st Century

Our First Archivist, Robert D.W. Connor

The National Archives was created on June 19, 1934. During the month of June, the National Archives History Office is sharing stories about the former Archivists of the United States. Today's post is from Sarah Basilion.  When President Franklin D. Roosevelt appointed Robert D.W. Connor the first Archivist of the United States in 1934, Connor faced … Continue reading Our First Archivist, Robert D.W. Connor

The act that gave us a National Archives

Today's post comes from Kaitlin Errickson of the National Archives History Office.  May 25, 2016, marks the 90th anniversary of the Public Buildings Act of 1926, without which the National Archives Building would not exist as it does today. The road to 1926 was a rough one—many papers and archives were destroyed throughout the 19th … Continue reading The act that gave us a National Archives

The Wild, Wild West . . . of Pennsylvania Avenue

We are wrapping up our celebration of Black History Month. Today’s post comes from Hailey Philbin. On a sunny day in 1944, young Sara Jackson walked along the noisy DC streets right into the National Archives and asked for a job. It wasn’t very often that someone walked in from the street asking for a … Continue reading The Wild, Wild West . . . of Pennsylvania Avenue

New Online Exhibit: The Temple of our History

Opened in 1935, the National Archives Building in Washington, DC, was created to hold the nation’s most important and influential documents in American history. The National Archives History Office has produced a new online exhibit on the National Archives Building, which is available in Google Cultural Institute. In the 19th century, historians and elected officials … Continue reading New Online Exhibit: The Temple of our History