What you may not know about the Bill of Rights

December 15 is Bill of Rights Day, which commemorates the ratification of the first 10 amendments to the U.S. Constitution. For more information on events and resources at the National Archives, visit our Bill of Rights Day website. How much do you know about the Bill of Rights? We know a lot and have written … Continue reading What you may not know about the Bill of Rights

The First Amendments to the U.S. Constitution

Two hundred and thirty years ago on September 25, 1789, Congress passed the very first proposed amendments to the U.S. Constitution. Ten of these eventually became the Bill of Rights.   During the period of the ratification of the U.S. Constitution, one of the biggest criticisms of the document was that it lacked a bill of … Continue reading The First Amendments to the U.S. Constitution

My Fellow Americans: Bill of Rights Day at the National Archives

December 15 is Bill of Rights Day, which commemorates the ratification of the first 10 amendments to the U.S. Constitution. For more information on events and resources at the National Archives, visit our Bill of Rights Day website. "I hereby declare, on oath, that I absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity … Continue reading My Fellow Americans: Bill of Rights Day at the National Archives

Bill of Rights Day: The People’s Vote

December 15 is Bill of Rights Day, which commemorates the ratification of the first 10 amendments to the U.S. Constitution. Today’s post comes from Bailey Martin from the National Archives History Office. December 15, Bill of Rights Day, is an important day for the National Archives because it is the one day of the year … Continue reading Bill of Rights Day: The People’s Vote

Bill of Rights Day: Celebrating Our Most Precious Freedoms

December 15 is Bill of Rights Day, which commemorates the ratification of the first 10 amendments to the U.S. Constitution. For more information on events and resources at the  National Archives, visit our Bill of Rights Day website. While the National Archives has well documented its many celebrations for Constitution Day and July 4th, we haven’t paid … Continue reading Bill of Rights Day: Celebrating Our Most Precious Freedoms

Last chance to see Amending America

Today’s post comes from Christine Blackerby, archives specialist in the Center for Legislative Archives at the National Archives in Washington, DC. She is also co-curator of the exhibit “Amending America.” More than 11,000 constitutional amendments have been introduced in Congress since the Constitution was written in 1787. What most of these proposals have in common, … Continue reading Last chance to see Amending America

From 1600 to 700 Pennsylvania Avenue: Presidential Visits to the National Archives

Since the National Archives was established more than 80 years ago, millions of people from the United States and abroad have visited our historic building in Washington, DC. Ten of those visitors were sitting U.S. Presidents. In 1933, before there was a building, President Herbert Hoover became the first President to visit when he laid … Continue reading From 1600 to 700 Pennsylvania Avenue: Presidential Visits to the National Archives

Featured Document: A Right to a Fair Trial

Gideon v. Wainwright (1963), is the landmark the Supreme Court decision that requires states to provide defense attorneys for criminal defendants who can’t afford them. The case centers on Clarence Earl Gideon, a poor drifter with an eighth-grade education. Gideon was arrested in 1961 for allegedly breaking into pool hall and stealing money and alcohol. … Continue reading Featured Document: A Right to a Fair Trial

Bill of Rights Day

December 15 is Bill of Rights Day which commemorates the ratification of the first ten amendments to the U.S. Constitution.  As we celebrate the 225th anniversary of the Bill of Rights on December 15—Bill of Rights Day—let’s take a look back at the origins and history of that day. On December 15, 1791, the first 10 amendments … Continue reading Bill of Rights Day

New Online Exhibit: “Carting the Charters”

Today’s post comes from Sanjana Barr of the National Archives History Office. Even though the National Archives Rotunda was completed in the mid-1930s as a shrine for the Declaration of Independence and Constitution, the documents were not transferred to the National Archives until 1952. The National Archives History Office has produced a new online exhibit … Continue reading New Online Exhibit: “Carting the Charters”