7 reasons to start celebrating July 4 on June 30!

John Adams thought Independence Day should be celebrated July 2, but we start celebrating on June 29! See a full schedule of July 4 events at the National Archives: http://go.usa.gov/xQB3d ONE See the National Archives Building lit up with patriotic colors!   TWO Eat chocolate and feel patriotic! George Washington enjoyed drinking a warm "chocolate cream" at … Continue reading 7 reasons to start celebrating July 4 on June 30!

The National Archives and the National Museum of the American Indian: A Partnership

The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) and the National Museum of the American Indian have been working together for many years. Over that time, we have built a strong partnership, evidenced in our programming on the National Mall in Washington, DC, at the Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House in New York City, and online. … Continue reading The National Archives and the National Museum of the American Indian: A Partnership

The Founding Fathers Face Off for the Fourth of July!

Today's post comes from Emily Rollman, summer intern with the Public and Media Communications Office. And the #FoundersFaceOff champion is John Adams! The National Archives, home of the Declaration of Independence, is holding its first #FoundersFaceOff in honor of Independence Day. This bracket-style tournament is similar to the NCAA’s March Madness basketball tournament, but this … Continue reading The Founding Fathers Face Off for the Fourth of July!

The “Gerry” in Gerrymandering

Today's post comes from James Worsham, editor of publications for the National Archives. The U.S. Supreme Court this week decided not to get involved in whether certain legislative and congressional districts have been “gerrymandered”—a practice that dates to the early days of the country. The cases before the court involved a practice in which districts … Continue reading The “Gerry” in Gerrymandering

Seven Patents to Delight Your Steampunk Friends

Today's post comes from Brooke Engerman, summer intern with the Office of Public and Media Communications. The steampunk movement is most associated with a definitive style of fashion and design which incorporates aspects of Victorian fashion accessorized with industrial materials. Most steampunk-inspired pieces—be it costumes or objects—are fantastical in nature and pull inspiration from science … Continue reading Seven Patents to Delight Your Steampunk Friends

Celebrating 10 million patents

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office will issue the 10 millionth utility patent on Tuesday, June 19, 2018. This is a historic milestone for the agency and for inventors in the United States. Use the hashtag #10MillionPatents to join the celebration. Today's post comes from Danielle Sklarew, an intern in the National Archives History Office. It's … Continue reading Celebrating 10 million patents

American Pride for Astronaut Sally Ride

Today’s Pride Month post comes from Danielle Sklarew, an intern in the National Archives History Office. On June 18, 1983, Dr. Sally Ride zoomed away from earth on a NASA Space Shuttle, breaking barriers as she reached immense heights. As Ride embarked on this mission, she officially became the first American woman to fly in … Continue reading American Pride for Astronaut Sally Ride

Do you have World Cup fever?!

Today’s post celebrates the international sporting event that captivates billions of people every four years: the FIFA World Cup! Every four years we get to experience the biggest sporting event on the planet and watch the very best of the beautiful game. Sadly, the U.S. national team did not qualify for the 2018 World Cup … Continue reading Do you have World Cup fever?!

USCIS and the Legacy of Ellis Island

Today's post comes from Allison Finkelstein, a historian with the U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services History Office and Library. The USCIS History Office and Library recently released a new documentary film project, USCIS and the Legacy of Ellis Island. From 1892 to 1954, the federal immigration service and its employees processed more than 12 million … Continue reading USCIS and the Legacy of Ellis Island