Notorious RBG at the National Archives

This year we have Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s returning to the National Archives on December 14, 2018, for our annual Bill of Rights Day naturalization ceremony. Today's post comes from Danielle Sklarew in the National Archives History Office. When Ruth Bader Ginsburg visited the National Archives on August 26, 1993—16 days after she … Continue reading Notorious RBG at the National Archives

My Fellow Americans: Bill of Rights Day at the National Archives

December 15 is Bill of Rights Day, which commemorates the ratification of the first 10 amendments to the U.S. Constitution. For more information on events and resources at the National Archives, visit our Bill of Rights Day website. "I hereby declare, on oath, that I absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity … Continue reading My Fellow Americans: Bill of Rights Day at the National Archives

USCIS and the Legacy of Ellis Island

Today's post comes from Allison Finkelstein, a historian with the U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services History Office and Library. The USCIS History Office and Library recently released a new documentary film project, USCIS and the Legacy of Ellis Island. From 1892 to 1954, the federal immigration service and its employees processed more than 12 million … Continue reading USCIS and the Legacy of Ellis Island

Constitution Day through the years

September 17 is designated as Constitution Day and Citizenship Day to commemorate the signing of the U.S. Constitution in Philadelphia on September 17, 1787! Today’s post comes from Rebecca Watford from the National Archives History Office. As the keeper of the U.S. Constitution, the National Archives has a long tradition of celebrating Constitution Day.   … Continue reading Constitution Day through the years

Fifty Year Later: A Brief History of the Immigration Act of 1965

Today’s post comes from Rebecca Brenner, an intern in the History Office at the National Archives in Washington, D.C. Fifty years ago on October 3, 1965, at the base of the Statue of Liberty, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Immigration Act of 1965 into law. The act was an important milestone in American immigration … Continue reading Fifty Year Later: A Brief History of the Immigration Act of 1965

I am an American

September 17 marks the annual celebration known as Constitution Day and Citizenship Day. On the morning of June 18, 2014, in the Rotunda of the National Archives Building First Lady Michelle Obama congratulated a room full of 35 new American citizens and their families. Her speech marked the culmination of a process that individuals have … Continue reading I am an American

The Bill of Rights: 14 Originals

Bill of Rights Day  is on December 15. The National Archives will celebrate on Friday with a naturalization ceremony. Today's post comes from Jessie Kratz, the Historian of the National Archives. On September 28, 1789, Speaker of the House Frederick Muhlenberg and Vice President John Adams signed the enrolled copy of the first proposed amendments to the … Continue reading The Bill of Rights: 14 Originals

Mother–she isn’t quite herself today

Today's post comes from National Archives Office of Strategy and Communications staff writer Rob Crotty. Few individuals had a more, ah, peculiar relationship with their mother than Norman Bates in the movie Psycho, which premiered 50 years ago today in New York City. The movie was a one-of-a-kind in terms of suspense and shock, but … Continue reading Mother–she isn’t quite herself today