Celebrating NASA’s 60th Anniversary

Shooting for the stars for the past 60 years, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration celebrates its 60th anniversary this year. Better known as NASA, this independent agency has been overseeing the civilian space program and conducting research in aeronautics and aerospace since 1958. Use #ArchivesInSpace to be part of the NASA and the National Archives … Continue reading Celebrating NASA’s 60th Anniversary

Are You Watching the XXIII Winter Olympics?

Today’s post comes from Madie Ward in the National Archives History Office. The XXIII Winter Olympics are here! They are being held in PyeongChang, Republic of Korea, from February 9 to 25. With a total of 102 medal events, this year’s Olympics is the first to surpass 100. The games feature fifteen disciplines: alpine skiing, … Continue reading Are You Watching the XXIII Winter Olympics?

Reflections of Two American Archivists on the Soviet Union’s Archives

Today's post come from Erik Moshe from the National Archives Public Media and Communications Office. You can read the entire article online on the National Archives website.  Just months after President Ronald Reagan’s "Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall!" speech in West Berlin in 1987, two men arrived in Russia. Their destination: the Soviet Archival Research Center. … Continue reading Reflections of Two American Archivists on the Soviet Union’s Archives

Moon Landings at the Nixon Library

October is American Archives Month! We’re celebrating the work of archivists and the importance of archives with a series of blog posts highlighting our “Archives Across America.” Today’s post comes from staff at the Nixon Presidential Library in Yorba Linda, California. On July 20, 1969, astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin became the first humans … Continue reading Moon Landings at the Nixon Library

One Giant Leap: The Apollo Space Program at 50

Today’s post comes from Garet Anderson-Lind from the National Archives History Office. Fifty years ago, one of the greatest enterprises in human history began: the Apollo Space Program. Through the collective effort of a nation, it was going to put a man on the Moon. While many here in the United States are aware of … Continue reading One Giant Leap: The Apollo Space Program at 50

On Exhibit: The “Yeti Memo”

Today’s post comes from Sanjana Barr from the National Archives History Office. In 1959, the U.S. State Department received a curious memo from the new U.S. Embassy in Nepal concerning the regulations for Yeti hunting. The Himalayan Yeti, a mythological creature often compared to Bigfoot, achieved international infamy in the 1950s. Western climbers ascending Mount … Continue reading On Exhibit: The “Yeti Memo”

Protecting the Bill of Rights: the Mosler Vault

In April 1952 Congress ordered the Library of Congress to transfer the Declaration of Independence and Constitution to the National Archives. The two documents were to go on public display in the National Archives Building along with the Bill of Rights, which was already at the Archives. While the Archives exhibition hall had been specifically … Continue reading Protecting the Bill of Rights: the Mosler Vault

Was Ike a secret New Dealer?

Today’s post is from Jim Worsham, editor of Prologue magazine, the quarterly of the National Archives. Was Dwight D. Eisenhower—the architect of the allied victory over the Nazis in World War II and our President during the peaceful 1950s—a secret New Dealer? Eisenhower, elected President as a Republican in 1952, brought in with him a Republican-controlled Congress. … Continue reading Was Ike a secret New Dealer?

Ernest Hemingway and the JFK Library

October is American Archives Month! We're celebrating the work of archivists and the importance of archives with a series of blog posts about the Presidential libraries. The records created by Presidents while in office will become part of the National Archives, and eventually will be used by researchers. Here's how it happens!  Today’s post comes … Continue reading Ernest Hemingway and the JFK Library

Monuments Men Coming to the National Archives

A new movie due for release next month tells the story of a special unit of Allied soldiers in Europe at the end of World War II. They were charged with finding and savings works of art and other cultural artifacts that the Nazis had seized. Officially, this unit was called the Monuments, Fine Art, … Continue reading Monuments Men Coming to the National Archives