On Exhibit: Report concerning the death of Abraham Lincoln

Today's post comes from Zach Kopin, an intern in the National Archives History Office in Washington, DC. On March 4, 1865, President Abraham Lincoln delivered his second inaugural address at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC. Dr. Charles A. Leale, a doctor and army surgeon in town from New York, listened with rapt attention to … Continue reading On Exhibit: Report concerning the death of Abraham Lincoln

An airing of grievances: A pension clerk’s appeal

In honor of Festivus, this seems like the perfect document for the airing of grievances. This feature was originally published in Prologue: Quarterly of the National Archives (Summer 2013). At the National Archives, and almost any other archival institution, one of the principal rules for using original records is to keep the records in the same order … Continue reading An airing of grievances: A pension clerk’s appeal

Remembering the Geneva Convention through the words of Clara Barton

Today’s post comes from Christina James, intern in the National Archives History Office. This year marks the 150th anniversary of the Geneva Convention of 1864. At a gathering in Geneva, Switzerland, 16 countries established protocol for treatment of individuals wounded in armed conflicts. Among the points agreed upon by the representatives in attendance were aid to … Continue reading Remembering the Geneva Convention through the words of Clara Barton

On Exhibit: John Wilkes Booth’s Calling Card

Today's post comes from Emma Rothberg, intern in the National Archives History Office.  Tucked in a corner in the Lawrence F. O’Brien Gallery at the National Archives in Washington, DC, is a rectangular piece of paper faded grey with time. It is unobtrusive and, due to its small size, could easily be missed among the larger … Continue reading On Exhibit: John Wilkes Booth’s Calling Card

Three Mathew Brady Photographs

In celebration of American Archives Month, the National Archives is teaming up with the Academy of American Poets. Throughout the month we’ll be publishing original poems inspired by the holdings of the National Archives. To view the poets performing their original work, visit the National Archives YouTube Channel.  Today we have three poems by Eric … Continue reading Three Mathew Brady Photographs

Loan to Nevada Museum of Art

Today's post comes from James Zeender, Senior Registrar at the National Archives.  The Emancipation Proclamation will be on exhibit at the Nevada Museum of Art for 36 hours from October 30 to November 2, 2014. This will be the capstone to the museum's exhibition "The 36th Star: Nevada's Journey from Territory to State," which opened on August 2. It features … Continue reading Loan to Nevada Museum of Art

Civil War Fashion: A Facial Hair Frenzy

Today's post comes from Marisa Hawley, intern in the National Archives Strategy and Communications office. As part of the "six weeks of style" celebration to recognize the Foundation for the National Archives' partnership with DC Fashion Week, we are showcasing fashion-related records from our holdings. This week's fashion theme is Classy Women (and Men) of the 19th Century. … Continue reading Civil War Fashion: A Facial Hair Frenzy

Now on display: Whitman’s Report on Cemeteries

In honor of Memorial Day, the 1869 Whitman Report on Cemeteries is on display in the East Rotunda Gallery of the National Archives Building from May 22 through June 5. Today's post comes from curator Alice Kamps. Memorial Day traditions began in the aftermath of the Civil War. The American people were just beginning what historian Drew Gilpin … Continue reading Now on display: Whitman’s Report on Cemeteries

Celebrating a commitment to civil rights at the Johnson Presidential Library

Throughout the month of April, the Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library will be exhibiting four cornerstone documents of civil rights. The “Cornerstones of Civil Rights” exhibit will run from April 1 through 30. The exhibit will feature two documents signed by President Abraham Lincoln: an authorized, printed edition of the Emancipation Proclamation; and a copy of the Senate resolution … Continue reading Celebrating a commitment to civil rights at the Johnson Presidential Library

Celebrating the life of an ancestor who was a “12 Years A Slave”

This past summer, Vera Williams attended her annual family reunion and Solomon Northup Day. The day honors her great-great-great grandfather, Solomon Northup, a free black man who was kidnapped and forced into slavery in 1841. When Northup escaped, he wrote a book about his experiences and—most shockingly for that era—took his kidnappers to trial. The … Continue reading Celebrating the life of an ancestor who was a “12 Years A Slave”