The Lost Battalion of World War I

Today’s post comes from Garet Anderson-Lind, an intern with the National Archives History Office. As we commemorate the 100-year anniversary of World War I, let's take a look at the heroic actions of a particular group of American forces during the Great War: the courageous soldiers of the “Lost Battalion” and their actions during the … Continue reading The Lost Battalion of World War I

Where were our World War II leaders during World War I?

Today’s post comes from Jim Worsham, editor of Prologue, the quarterly magazine of the National Archives. As the nation began assembling its troops to fight World War I in Europe, Capt.  Dwight D. Eisenhower desperately wanted a combat assignment. And “Ike” never passed up an opportunity to put in for one, even being reprimanded for … Continue reading Where were our World War II leaders during World War I?

Defining a Spy: the Espionage Act

Today’s post comes from Sonia Kahn in the National Archives History Office. Visit the National Archives website for a full list of events and activities related to the 100th anniversary of World War I.  On June 15, 1917, just two months after the United States entered World War I, Congress adopted the Espionage Act. The act, … Continue reading Defining a Spy: the Espionage Act

Happy Mother’s Day!

Every year I struggle with how I can show appreciation for my mom on Mother’s Day. This year I'm going retro and “making” my mom a gift by highlighting some of the National Archives holdings that relate to Mother’s Day. Although it was celebrated in several states for years, the first time Mother’s Day became … Continue reading Happy Mother’s Day!

The origins of America’s Unlucky Lottery

Today’s post comes from Sonia Kahn in the National Archives History Office. Visit the National Archives website for a full list of events and activities related to the 100th anniversary of World War I.  The draft—the lottery no one wants to win. On April 6, 1917, the United States formally joined World War I, which … Continue reading The origins of America’s Unlucky Lottery

U.S. Entry into the War to End All Wars

2017 marks the 100th anniversary of U.S. entry into World War I. Visit the National Archives website to learn how the National Archives is commemorating the anniversary. Today’s post comes from Sonia Kahn in the National Archives History Office.  Two and a half years of American neutrality in the ongoing war in Europe came to an … Continue reading U.S. Entry into the War to End All Wars

Jeannette Rankin: The woman who voted to give women the right to vote

Today’s post comes from Christine Blackerby, an archives specialist with the Center for Legislative Archives at the National Archives in Washington, DC. 2017 marks the centennial of the swearing-in of the first woman to become a member of the U.S. Congress, Jeannette Rankin (R-Montana). A pacifist and suffragist, Rankin was elected to Congress four years … Continue reading Jeannette Rankin: The woman who voted to give women the right to vote

The Gems of Record Group 242 – Foreign Records Seized

Today’s post comes from Sonia Kahn in the National Archives History Office. It is part one of a series on the history behind some of the seized foreign records housed at the National Archives. When you think of the holdings at the National Archives, it’s likely that three prominent documents immediately come to mind. After … Continue reading The Gems of Record Group 242 – Foreign Records Seized

The American Flag

Today's post, in honor of Flag Day, comes from Alex Nieuwsma, an intern in the National Archives History Office. On June 14, 1777, the Second Continental Congress officially adopted the Stars and Stripes as the National Flag of the United States of America. Through its many changes and iterations, the American flag has come to … Continue reading The American Flag

The Coca-Cola Bottle: Celebrating 100 Years of an American Icon

Today the Coca-Cola bottle is one of the most recognizable containers in the world, but a century ago nearly all soda bottles looked the same. To distinguish its product from competitors, in 1915 the Coca-Cola Company launched a competition among glassmakers to design a new bottle that was distinctive in both look and feel. The … Continue reading The Coca-Cola Bottle: Celebrating 100 Years of an American Icon