New Online Exhibit: “Carting the Charters”

Today’s post comes from Sanjana Barr of the National Archives History Office. Even though the National Archives Rotunda was completed in the mid-1930s as a shrine for the Declaration of Independence and Constitution, the documents were not transferred to the National Archives until 1952. The National Archives History Office has produced a new online exhibit … Continue reading New Online Exhibit: “Carting the Charters”

Remembering “a date which will live in infamy”

Today’s post comes from Sonia Kahn in the National Archives History Office. From its food to its anime to its cars to its video games, Japanese culture is part of everyday American life today. In 1941, however, the idea of so much Japanese influence in our daily lives would have been inconceivable, especially after the events … Continue reading Remembering “a date which will live in infamy”

Historian’s Notebook: The Bill of Rights at 225

This post is from Jessie Kratz, Historian of the National Archives. It's from the Winter 2016 issue of Prologue magazine.  The travels of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution have been chronicled frequently over the years—in fact, they are fascinating stories. However, the third “Charter of Freedom”—the Bill of Rights—has been largely overlooked. As we … Continue reading Historian’s Notebook: The Bill of Rights at 225

Ratifying the Bill of Rights . . . in 1939

This post comes from Mary Ryan, managing editor of Prologue magazine and was originally published in the Winter 2016 issue of Prologue. On December 15 we observe the 225th anniversary of the ratification of the Bill of Rights. One-by-one, from 1789 to 1791, the states ratified 10 amendments to the nation’s new Constitution. The process had begun … Continue reading Ratifying the Bill of Rights . . . in 1939

Slavery at George Washington’s Mount Vernon

Today's post comes from Jim Zeender, Senior Registrar in the National Archives Exhibits Office. On October 1, 2016, the Mount Vernon Museum opened a new and groundbreaking exhibition called “Lives Bound Together: Slavery at George Washington’s Mount Vernon.” The exhibition explores the long and complex relationship between George Washington and his slaves and his evolving attitudes … Continue reading Slavery at George Washington’s Mount Vernon

A Trip to Williamsburg

Today's post comes from Jim Zeender, Senior Registrar in the National Archives Exhibits Program in Washington, DC.  In early September I had the pleasure of taking a train to Williamsburg, Virginia. I have taken trains to Philadelphia, New York, and New Haven numerous times. Overseas, I have been on trains in England, France, Austria and Switzerland. … Continue reading A Trip to Williamsburg

Gerald Ford: President and Veteran

In honor of Veterans Day, today’s post comes to you from Sanjana Barr of the National Archives History Office. On September 20, 1975, President Gerald R. Ford signed legislation returning the official date for celebrating Veterans Day to November 11. For the previous four years, Veterans Day had been observed on the fourth Monday in … Continue reading Gerald Ford: President and Veteran

The Election of 1800

Anyone who is a fan of the hit musical Hamilton knows the song “Election of 1800.” It depicts an infamous election that ultimately led us to change our Constitution. By 1800, the nation's first two political parties were beginning to take shape. The two major candidates for President were the Federalist President, John Adams, and the … Continue reading The Election of 1800