Carlisle Indian School’s World War I Soldiers

November is Native American Heritage Month. Visit National Archives News for more information on related resources. Today’s post comes from Rachel Bartgis, conservator technician at the National Archives at College Park, MD. Founded in 1879, the United States Indian Industrial School in Carlisle, Pennsylvania (generally called the Carlisle Indian School) was a federally funded boarding … Continue reading Carlisle Indian School’s World War I Soldiers

The Sinking of the USS Indianapolis

July 30, 2020, marks the 75th Anniversary of the sinking of the USS Indianapolis. Today’s post comes from Michael J. Hancock, archives technician at the National Archives at College Park, MD. Sometimes a movie can provide a history lesson in its story arc—an event that few in the audience are familiar with. Such is the … Continue reading The Sinking of the USS Indianapolis

The Power of American Indian Boarding School Records

November is Native American Heritage Month. Visit National Archives News for more information on related events and resources. Today’s post comes from Gwen Granados, Director of the National Archives at Riverside, California. Not only the voices of policy makers and administrators appear in the records of the National Archives, but also those of individual people … Continue reading The Power of American Indian Boarding School Records

The National Archives and the National Museum of the American Indian: A Partnership

The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) and the National Museum of the American Indian have been working together for many years. Over that time, we have built a strong partnership, evidenced in our programming on the National Mall in Washington, DC, at the Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House in New York City, and online. … Continue reading The National Archives and the National Museum of the American Indian: A Partnership

Nation to Nation: Treaties at the National Museum of the American Indian

November is National Native American Heritage Month! Visit our web page for resources on related records and how we are commemorating the month. Today’s post comes from Becca Watford from the National Archives History Office. Every few months the National Archives lends a treaty negotiated between the United States and Native Americans to the National … Continue reading Nation to Nation: Treaties at the National Museum of the American Indian

“A Real Injustice Was Done to These Two Old Scouts”: The VA Claim File of an Indian Scout

We’re wrapping up our month-long celebration of the work of archivists and the importance of archives for American Archives Month. Today’s post comes from Tavis Anderson, an archivist at the National Archives at St. Louis. In the holdings of the National Archives at St. Louis sits a Deceased Veterans Claim File for a veteran named Kayitah, also known … Continue reading “A Real Injustice Was Done to These Two Old Scouts”: The VA Claim File of an Indian Scout

On Exhibit: the Indian Removal Act

In the early 19th century, American demand for Indian nations’ land increased, and momentum grew to force Indians further west. The first major step to relocate American Indians came when Congress passed, and President Andrew Jackson signed, the Indian Removal Act on May 28, 1830. It authorized the President to negotiate removal treaties with Indian … Continue reading On Exhibit: the Indian Removal Act

“Indian New Deal”

Today’s post from Eric Rhodes, intern in the National Archives History Office, highlights the National Archives’ Native American holdings in celebration of Native American Heritage Month. In the 1930s, in an effort to remedy the hardships Native Americans had faced under U.S. policy, Commissioner of the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) John Collier took advantage … Continue reading “Indian New Deal”

Indian Treaties at the Museum of the American Indian

Almost 220 years ago, representatives of the United States and more than 1,600 people from Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) Confederacy (Six Nations—Seneca, Cayuga, Onondaga, Oneida, Mohawk, and Tuscarora) gathered together near Canandaigua, New York (the Finger Lakes region) to discuss peace and friendship. On November 11, 1794, more than 50 chiefs and sachems, including Cornplanter and Red … Continue reading Indian Treaties at the Museum of the American Indian

The Importance of Records: Japanese American Incarceration During World War II

The National Historic Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board is considering the National Archives Building in Washington, DC, to be a National Historic Landmark. The study includes the history of the building as well as ways records housed in the National Archives Building have been used throughout history. Today’s post looks at … Continue reading The Importance of Records: Japanese American Incarceration During World War II