The National Archives and 1968: A Year of Triumph and Tragedy

Today's post comes from Kerri Lawrence, Writer-Editor for the National Archives News. This year marks the 50th anniversary of 1968, a year of turmoil and change in the United States and the world.   In reflection, 1968 was a year of triumph and tragedy. International and national events changed the landscape of America and the world around … Continue reading The National Archives and 1968: A Year of Triumph and Tragedy

Facial Hair Friday Returns!

Whether it be beards, mustaches, burnsides, goatees, sideburns, or the good ol’ mutton chops, every first Friday of the month we’ll bring you the finest facial hair from the holdings of National Archives. Why are we bringing back Facial Hair Friday? It is fate—two recent posts had photos of John Alexander Logan, and while looking at … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday Returns!

The Nation’s Sacrifice: The Origins and Evolution of Memorial Day

Today’s post comes from John P. Blair with the National Archives History Office. On May 28, 2018, our nation observes a federal holiday—Memorial Day—that was signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson on June 28, 1968, to take effect on January 1, 1971. Yes, officially Memorial Day as a legal national holiday is only 50 years … Continue reading The Nation’s Sacrifice: The Origins and Evolution of Memorial Day

The National Archives’ larger-than-life statues

Do you want to learn more about the history and architecture of National Archives Building in Washington, DC? Join us online Thursday, May 24, 2018, at noon for a Facebook Live tour of the building’s exterior. For more information, follow us on Facebook! On each side of the National Archives Building in Washington, DC (on … Continue reading The National Archives’ larger-than-life statues

Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo is on the “Border”

Today’s post comes from Jim Zeender, Senior Registrar in the National Archives Exhibits Office. Recently, National Archives conservator Morgan Zinsmeister and I traveled to Pueblo, Colorado, which once stood on the border between the United States and Mexico. We were there to install the original Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo in the “Borderlands of Southern Colorado” exhibition … Continue reading Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo is on the “Border”

President Johnson’s Impeachment Trial

Today’s post comes from Tom Eisinger, an archivist in the Center for Legislative Archives at the National Archives in Washington, DC. It is part two of a two-part series on the impeachment of President Andrew Johnson, which occurred 150 years ago.  On March 4, 1868, the House of Representatives formally presented 11 articles of impeachment to … Continue reading President Johnson’s Impeachment Trial

National Archives-Thai Friendship

May is Asian Pacific American Heritage Month. Visit the National Archives website for more information and related resources. In March 2018, a new exhibit opened in Bangkok, Thailand, featuring more than 40 records and gifts from the National Archives. “Great and Good Friends: 200 Years of U.S.-Thai Friendship” runs from March 21 through June 30, … Continue reading National Archives-Thai Friendship

13 Times the Presidents Were Just Like Us

May is National Photo Month, and to celebrate, we’re sharing photos from the National Archives showing that Presidents are people too! Today’s listicle comes from Anayeli Nuñez from the National Archives History Office. 1. When Clinton stepped out for a jog in this 90s monochromatic outfit. Iconic.   2. When Nixon tried getting as close as … Continue reading 13 Times the Presidents Were Just Like Us

The Washington Monument Collection and the Know-Nothing Party

Today’s post comes from John Lockwood, a long-time federal employee who has written numerous articles, many for the National Archives. I was recently downtown at the National Archives, looking for old records of the Know-Nothing Party, when they were in charge of the Washington Monument’s construction for a few years. I did find one interesting … Continue reading The Washington Monument Collection and the Know-Nothing Party

UFOs: Man-Made, Made Up, and Unknown

Today’s post comes from Joseph Gillette, an archivist on a cross-training assignment in the National Archives History Office. This is the last in a series concerning the Air Force’s Project Blue Book investigation. Part I addressed the challenges the National Archives faced in providing access to the records. Part II addressed general Air Force investigatory … Continue reading UFOs: Man-Made, Made Up, and Unknown