Contact, Brawls, and Chambering: The Combat Action Ribbon

Today’s post comes from Thomas Richardson, an expert archives technician at the National Personnel Records Center (NPRC) in St. Louis, Missouri.  Not all service members in the United States Armed Forces serve in combat. In fact, fewer than 15 percent of enlisted personnel ever see combat or are assigned a combat role. How can one … Continue reading Contact, Brawls, and Chambering: The Combat Action Ribbon

Facial Hair Friday: the Mustache Spoon

Since the origin of our nation, women inventors have contributed innovations large and small to our society. For Women's History Month, today's Facial Hair Friday post features a very specialized invention developed by a woman for use by men. Before modern-day hipsters donned their flamboyant facial hair, large, extravagant mustaches were all the rage in … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: the Mustache Spoon

Marian Anderson’s 1939 Easter Concert

We're concluding Black History Month with a post on Marian Anderson from Adam Berenbak in the Center for Legislative Archives. For more information on resources related to African American History, visit the National Archives website. Petition from Omega Psi Phi, April 1939. (Records of the U.S. Senate, National Archives) This petition was sent to the … Continue reading Marian Anderson’s 1939 Easter Concert

Historic Staff Spotlight: Lillian Grandy

We are taking a look at past staff and their many contributions to the National Archives throughout its history. Today’s staff spotlight is on Lillian Grandy, who began her National Archives career as a secretary and ended it as an exhibit specialist with a focus on Black history. Lillian Elizabeth Grandy (née Love) was born … Continue reading Historic Staff Spotlight: Lillian Grandy

Census Records Come to the National Archives

On April 1, 2022, the National Archives will release the 1950 Census. For more information on the records release, visit the National Archives website. Before the creation of the National Archives, the original census records were maintained by the federal departments that had jurisdiction over censuses throughout history—first the State Department, then the Department of … Continue reading Census Records Come to the National Archives

Asteroids and Meteors and Lawyers: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Copyright Law

This post highlights Maryland Civil Case No. 81-803, Atari, Inc. v. Amusement World, Inc., Box 1123, which is one of the many court records held at the National Archives at Philadelphia. It comes from Andrew Salyer, an archives technician at the National Archives at Philadelphia. Detail from advertisement for Asteroids, Play Meter Vol. 7, July … Continue reading Asteroids and Meteors and Lawyers: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Copyright Law

Facial Hair Friday: Robert Smalls

February is Black History Month. Visit the National Archives website for more information and resources on African American History. Today’s Facial Hair Friday post about Robert Smalls comes from Rachel Bartgis, conservator technician at the National Archives at College Park, MD. Robert Smalls was an American boat pilot, politician, and businessman whose daring heroism during … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: Robert Smalls

Historic Staff Spotlight: Bess Glenn

This year we are taking a look at past staff and their many contributions to the National Archives throughout history. Today’s staff spotlight is on Bess Glenn, who worked for the National Archives from 1936 to her retirement in 1962 and was one of the first female archivists at the agency. Bess Glenn, 1951. (National … Continue reading Historic Staff Spotlight: Bess Glenn

Census Records: The 72-Year Rule

On April 1, 2022, the National Archives will open the 1950 Census. For more information on the records release, visit the National Archives website. Shortly after the National Archives was established, the Archivist of the United States made an agreement with the Director of the Bureau of the Census to acquire the decennial census records … Continue reading Census Records: The 72-Year Rule

North Platte Feeds the Troops

Today's post comes from Joshua Cain, an archives technician at the National Archives in College Park, MD. It features digitized videos and images available in the National Archives Catalog highlighting North Platte's role in World War II. In the early to mid-1900s, North Platte, Nebraska, was a small farm town located on the Union Pacific … Continue reading North Platte Feeds the Troops