Putting the “Rat” in Ratification: Tennessee’s role in the 19th amendment

In 1878 Senator Aaron A. Sargent introduced into Congress a resolution proposing a constitutional amendment granting women the right to vote. On June 4, 1919,  after 40 years—and much effort and debate—Congress passed, by a two-thirds vote of both houses, that proposed amendment. It was then up to the states to ratify it.  Many states … Continue reading Putting the “Rat” in Ratification: Tennessee’s role in the 19th amendment

Suffrage and suffering at the 1913 March

Today's blog post comes from Jessie Kratz, archives specialist in the Center for Legislative Archives. If you are participating in the 100th anniversary of the parade on Sunday, stop by the National Archives to see the document that finally gave women the right to vote. The 19th Amendment is on display from March 1 to … Continue reading Suffrage and suffering at the 1913 March

Women can’t vote, but they can run for Congress

Today's post comes from National Archives Office of Strategy and Communications staff writer Rob Crotty. While the Constitution does not say who is eligible to vote, it does say who is eligible to run for Congress. No Person shall be a Representative who shall not have attained to the age of twenty-five Years, and been … Continue reading Women can’t vote, but they can run for Congress