Did Knute Rockne ever box Dwight D. Eisenhower?

Today’s post comes from Christopher Abraham at the Eisenhower Presidential Library. He answers a question each week on Facebook. This week’s Ask an Archivist query comes from Kansas. “Did Knute Rockne ever box Dwight D. Eisenhower? I heard that this took place in Abilene, Kansas, around 1913.” - Anonymous We have heard this story before. … Continue reading Did Knute Rockne ever box Dwight D. Eisenhower?

Eisenhower and (Tank) Driver’s Ed

Today’s post comes from Christopher Abraham at the Eisenhower Presidential Library. He answers a question each week on Facebook. This week’s Ask an Archivist query comes from Pennsylvania. "Did Eisenhower teach Patton how to drive a tank at Camp Colt in Gettysburg?" Anonymous Captain George S. Patton knew how to drive a tank by the … Continue reading Eisenhower and (Tank) Driver’s Ed

See 13 Inaugurations in Four Days at the National Archives

On Monday, January 21, President Obama will be sworn in for a second term. It will be the 57th Presidential Inauguration. Beginning at 11:30 a.m., the President’s swearing-in ceremony will be shown live in the William G. McGowan Theater at the National Archives. If you are in Washington, DC, don't miss this chance to see … Continue reading See 13 Inaugurations in Four Days at the National Archives

Merry Christmas from Space!

Once upon a time, space was quiet. This was before satellites had cluttered the orbit of the earth, beaming TV shows and text messages and GPS coordinates. Before 1958, space was very quiet. On December 18, 1958, the Air Force placed the first communications satellite, a Project SCORE relay vehicle, into orbit. And then, on … Continue reading Merry Christmas from Space!

A letter to the President—in Braille

This week marks the 22nd anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act. The National Archives holds many records that relate to American citizens with disabilities. From personal letters to historic legislation, these records from the Presidential Libraries provide insight into disability history. For the opening of the Public Vaults exhibition at the National Archives Building … Continue reading A letter to the President—in Braille

Football Friday: Presidents and the Pigskin

Today's post comes from Gregory Marose, an intern in the National Archives Office of Strategy and Communications. With Super Bowl Sunday just two days away, we’ve decided to call an audible and make today's "Facial Hair Friday" into a "Football Friday." When the New England Patriots and New York Giants collide in this year’s Super Bowl, … Continue reading Football Friday: Presidents and the Pigskin

George Clooney and the National Archives: One degree of separation

Today's guest post was written by Miriam Kleiman, who works in the National Archives Public Affairs Office. George Clooney’s next film—which he will write, direct, and star in—is based on holdings from the National Archives!  Clooney announced last weekend that his number-one priority is to make a film about the “Monuments Men,” a group of … Continue reading George Clooney and the National Archives: One degree of separation

What’s Cooking Wednesday: Top Ten Food Records of 2011

As 2011 draws to a close, so does our exhibit "What's Cooking, Uncle Sam?" which will end on January 3, 2012. It's been a great year for food here at the National Archives. We've had amazing guests come and speak, including Chef José Andrés, our neighbor and Chief Culinary Adviser for the exhibit; Chef Roland … Continue reading What’s Cooking Wednesday: Top Ten Food Records of 2011

From Our Film Archives: “The March”

This Sunday is the anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington. To commemorate the event, the National Archives is displaying a program from the march in the East Rotunda Gallery and screening The March on August 27 and 28. But if you are not in Washington, DC, you can still watch the entire film on our YouTube … Continue reading From Our Film Archives: “The March”

Strange bedfellows: Nixon, Bush, and Sawyer

More than 400 White House staff  came to see Richard Nixon say farewell at 9.32 a.m. in the East Room of the White House. And when Nixon and his family walked to the waiting helicopter, staff and guests crowded across the lawn and porch. There were hundreds of people at the White House that historic morning. But politics … Continue reading Strange bedfellows: Nixon, Bush, and Sawyer