19th Amendment at 100: The 19th Amendment

The 19th Amendment was ratified in 1920, but this landmark event was neither the beginning nor the end of the story for women and their struggle for the right to vote. Join us as we commemorate the centennial year of 2020 with 12 stories from our holdings for you to save, print, or share. August’s … Continue reading 19th Amendment at 100: The 19th Amendment

The Sinking of the USS Indianapolis

July 30, 2020, marks the 75th Anniversary of the sinking of the USS Indianapolis. Today’s post comes from Michael J. Hancock, archives technician at the National Archives at College Park, MD. Sometimes a movie can provide a history lesson in its story arc—an event that few in the audience are familiar with. Such is the … Continue reading The Sinking of the USS Indianapolis

We Remember Civil Rights Legend John Lewis

Today's post comes from Miriam Kleiman, Public Affairs Specialist at the National Archives. There is perhaps no single figure whose own life and career embodies the promise, success, and continued challenges of civil rights for Black Americans than John Lewis. We mourn this tremendous loss and look back on his incredible history through our holdings … Continue reading We Remember Civil Rights Legend John Lewis

The Italian Service Units of World War II in Boston

Today’s post comes from Joseph P. Keefe, an archives specialist at the National Archives at Boston. In November 1942, following the Allies successful invasion of North Africa, over 51,000 Italian prisoners of war were sent to the United States to POW camps. On September 3, 1943, Allied forces made amphibious landings on the mainland of Italy, … Continue reading The Italian Service Units of World War II in Boston

The 1932 Bonus Army: Black and White Americans Unite in March on Washington

Today's post comes from Alice Kamps, a curator at the National Archives in Washington, DC. It would not be Gen. Douglas MacArthur’s last act of insubordination. Decades later, his recalcitrance cost him his career. But this time there would be no discernible consequences, at least not for him. Against direct orders from the President, MacArthur … Continue reading The 1932 Bonus Army: Black and White Americans Unite in March on Washington

The Tulsa Massacre

Today's post is by Miriam Kleiman, National Archives Program Director for Public Affairs.Even long after the Civil War, thousands of African Americans were hanged, burned and shot to death, beaten, and tortured by white mobs who celebrated these atrocities and were rarely prosecuted for their crimes. In 1918, Rep. Leonidas Dyer of Missouri submitted a … Continue reading The Tulsa Massacre

Facial Hair Friday: Born on the Fourth of July

An American author most known for the novels The Scarlet Letter and The House of Seven Gables, Nathaniel Hawthorne was born on July 4, 1804, in Salem, Massachusetts.  Nathaniel Hawthorne, ca. 1862. (National Archives Identifier 530280) In addition to being an author, the facial-haired fiction-writer was also a civil servant. He was a weigher and … Continue reading Facial Hair Friday: Born on the Fourth of July

My Name is Alex Hamilton

In celebration of the upcoming movie version of the musical Hamilton, we are highlighting two Hamilton-related documents from the National Archives holdings.  One of my favorite documents, and timely for Independence Day, is Alexander Hamilton’s Oath of Allegiance during the Revolutionary War. Alexander Hamilton's Oath of Allegiance, May 12, 1778. (National Archives Identifier 2524343) Hamilton … Continue reading My Name is Alex Hamilton